Jeroen W. den Boer

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Since 1977, the diagnostic tools for Legionnaires’ disease have been culture and serological investigation. Both methods require considerable time to produce results and have low to reasonable sensitivity. Since the introduction of urinary antigen tests in the mid 1990s, underdiagnosis has diminished and mortality has declined, thanks to early diagnosis. To(More)
The first serological test to identify antibodies against Legionella pneumophila was the indirect immunofluorescence antibody test (IFAT) developed in 1977 at the Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta, Ga., USA [1]. Several other tests have since been developed, among them rapid microagglutination tests (RMAT) [2] and numerous (mostly experimental)(More)
Legionnaires’ disease (LD) is an acute pneumonia caused by the inhalation or aspiration of aerosols contaminated with the Legionella bacteria. In the Netherlands, around 300 LD cases per year were reported between 2000 and 2008, but in 2009, the number dropped to 251, which was the lowest number in the previous 5 years of surveillance. We investigated if(More)
Polymorphisms leading to deficiency of mannose-binding lectin (MBL) are associated with predisposition to infection. However, MBL deficiency can be protective against intracellular pathogens that use MBL to enter host cells. The role of MBL genotype and activity in infection with the intracellular pathogen Legionella pneumophila was studied in a large(More)
Legionnaires’ disease (LD) is an acute pneumonia caused by the inhalation or aspiration of aerosols contaminated with Legionella bacteria. The watery environment is considered to be the natural habitat for these bacteria. Therefore, drinking water legislation is used in the primary prevention of LD, focussing on the different water sources to which the(More)
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