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Strategies to induce biofilm dispersal are of interest due to their potential to prevent biofilm formation and biofilm-related infections. Nitric oxide (NO), an important messenger molecule in biological systems, was previously identified as a signal for dispersal in biofilms of the model organism Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In the present study, the use of NO(More)
Intractable biofilm infections with Pseudomonas aeruginosa are the major cause of premature death associated with cystic fibrosis (CF). Few studies have explored the biofilm developmental cycle of P. aeruginosa isolates from chronically infected individuals. This study shows that such clinical isolates exhibit biofilm differentiation and dispersal processes(More)
Many plants and animals are defended from predation or herbivory by inhibitory secondary metabolites, which in the marine environment are very common among sessile organisms. Among bacteria, where there is the greatest metabolic potential, little is known about chemical defenses against bacterivorous consumers. An emerging hypothesis is that sessile(More)
In both natural and artificial environments, bacteria predominantly grow in biofilms, and bacteria often disperse from biofilms as freely suspended single-cells. In the present study, the formation and dispersal of planktonic cellular aggregates, or 'suspended biofilms', by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in liquid batch cultures were closely examined, and compared(More)
The psl gene cluster, comprising 15 cotranscribed genes from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, was recently identified as being involved in exopolysaccharide biosynthesis and biofilm formation. In this study, we investigated the regulation of the psl gene cluster and the function of the first gene in this cluster, the pslA gene. PslA shows strong similarities to(More)
Most biofilms in their natural environments are likely to consist of consortia of species that influence each other in synergistic and antagonistic manners. However, few reports specifically address interactions within multispecies biofilms. In this study, 17 epiphytic bacterial strains, isolated from the surface of the marine alga Ulva australis, were(More)
The survival of bacteria in nature is greatly enhanced by their ability to grow within surface-associated communities called biofilms. Commonly, biofilms generate proliferations of bacterial cells, called microcolonies, which are highly recalcitrant, 3-dimensional foci of bacterial growth. Microcolony growth is initiated by only a subpopulation of bacteria(More)
The newly described green-pigmented bacterium Pseudoalteromonas tunicata (D2) produces target-specific inhibitory compounds against bacteria, algae, fungi, and invertebrate larvae and is frequently found in association with living surfaces in the marine environment. As part of our studies on the ecology of P. tunicata and its interaction with marine(More)
Patients suffering from cystic fibrosis (CF) commonly harbor the important pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa in their airways. During chronic late-stage CF, P. aeruginosa is known to grow under reduced oxygen tension and is even capable of respiring anaerobically within the thickened airway mucus, at a pH of approximately 6.5. Therefore, proteins involved in(More)
Streptococcus pneumoniae accounts for a significant global burden of morbidity and mortality and biofilm development is increasingly recognised as important for colonization and infection. Analysis of protein expression patterns during biofilm development may therefore provide valuable insights to the understanding of pneumococcal persistence strategies and(More)