Jeremy V. Pitt

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E-markets and negotiation protocols are two types of application domains that can be viewed as open computational societies. Key characteristics of such societies are agent heterogeneity, conflicting individual goals and limited trust. The risk that members of such societies will not conform to specifications imposes the need for a framework that will(More)
Ad hoc networks may be viewed as computational systems whose members may fail to, or choose not to, comply with the rules governing their behaviour. We are investigating to what extent ad hoc networks can usefully be described in terms of permissions, obligations and other more complex normative relations, based on our previous work on specifying and(More)
There are fundamental l imitat ions on using mental att i tudes to formalise the semantics of an Agent Communicat ion Language (ACL) . I n stead, we define a general semantic framework for an A C L in terms of protocols. We then argue that the proper role of mental att i tudes is to l ink what an agent ' th inks' about the content of a message to what it(More)
Electronic markets, dispute resolution and negotiation protocols are three types of application domains that can be viewed as open agent societies. Key characteristics of such societies are agent heterogeneity, conflicting individual goals and unpredictable behavior. Members of such societies may fail to, or even choose not to, conform to the norms(More)
Online offences are generally considered as frequent and intentional acts performed by a member with the aim to deceive others. However, an offence may also be unintentional or exceptional, performed by a benevolent member of the community. This article examines whether a victim’s decrease in trust towards an unintentional or occasional offender can be(More)
A voting protocol for decision-making in virtual organizations is presented. In an agent-based virtual organization the functions of formation, management and dissolution of the organization are passed to software processes. Each phase in this life-cycle requires decision making: an ostensibly fair way for independent agents to make decisions is to take a(More)
In this paper we develop a notion of “objective trust” for Software Agents, that is trust of, or between, Agents based on actual experiences between those Agents. Experiential objective trust allows Agents to make decisions about how to select other Agents when a choice has to be made. We define a mechanism for such an “objective Trust-Based Agent”(More)