Jeremy U. Espino

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INTRODUCTION Computer-based outbreak and disease surveillance requires high-quality software that is well-supported and affordable. Developing software in an open-source framework, which entails free distribution and use of software and continuous, community-based software development, can produce software with such characteristics, and can do so rapidly.(More)
A surge of development of new public health surveillance systems designed to provide more timely detection of outbreaks suggests that public health has a new requirement: extreme timeliness of detection. The authors review previous work relevant to measuring timeliness and to defining timeliness requirements. Using signal detection theory and decision(More)
The goal of the Real-time Outbreak and Disease Surveillance (RODS) Open Source Project is to accelerate deployment of computer-based syndromic surveillance. To this end, the project has released the RODS software under the GNU General Public License and created an organizational structure to catalyze its development. This paper describes the design of the(More)
ICD-9-coded chief complaints and diagnoses are a routinely collected source of data with potential for use in public health surveillance. We constructed two detectors of acute respiratory illness: one based on ICD-9-coded chief complaints and one based on ICD-9-coded diagnoses. We measured the classification performance of these detectors against the human(More)
j J Am Med Inform Assoc. 2003;10:409–418. DOI 10.1197/jamia.M1357. The rapid, early detection of disease outbreaks has become a national priority and an emerging field of research. Kaufmann et al., after analyzing several bioterrorism scenarios, concluded that ‘‘delay in starting a prophylaxis program is the single most important factor leading to increased(More)
OBJECTIVE Design, build and evaluate a symptom-based probabilistic chief complaint classifier for the Real-time Outbreak and Disease Surveillance System (RODS). BACKGROUND Scientists have utilized many chief complaint (CC) classification techniques in biosurveillance including keyword search, weighted keyword search, and naïve Bayes. These techniques may(More)
During the 2001 AMIA Annual Symposium, the Anesthesia, Critical Care, and Emergency Medicine Working Group hosted the Roundtable on Bioterrorism Detection. Sixty-four people attended the roundtable discussion, during which several researchers discussed public health surveillance systems designed to enhance early detection of bioterrorism events. These(More)
We evaluated telephone triage (TT) data for public health early warning systems. TT data is electronically available and contains coded elements that include the demographics and description of a caller's medical complaints. In the study, we obtained emergency room TT data and after hours TT data from a commercial TT software and service company. We(More)
Given the post September 11th climate of possible bioterrorist attacks and the high profile 2002 Winter Olympics in the Salt Lake City, Utah, we challenged ourselves to deploy a computer-based real-time automated biosurveillance system for Utah, the Utah Real-time Outbreak and Disease Surveillance system (Utah RODS), in six weeks using our existing(More)
The PaTH (University of Pittsburgh/UPMC, Penn State College of Medicine, Temple University Hospital, and Johns Hopkins University) clinical data research network initiative is a collaborative effort among four academic health centers in the Mid-Atlantic region. PaTH will provide robust infrastructure to conduct research, explore clinical outcomes, link with(More)