Jennifer T. Crinion

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Previous studies of patients with phonological and surface alexia have demonstrated a double dissociation between the reading of pseudo words and words with atypical spelling-to-sound relationships. A corresponding double dissociation in the neuronal activation patterns for pseudo words and exception words has not, however, been consistently demonstrated in(More)
An important and unresolved question is how the human brain processes speech for meaning after initial analyses in early auditory cortical regions. A variety of left-hemispheric areas have been identified that clearly support semantic processing, although a systematic analysis of directed interactions among these areas is lacking. We applied dynamic causal(More)
Processing of speech is obligatory. Thus, during normal speech comprehension, the listener is aware of the overall meaning of the speaker's utterance without the need to direct attention to individual linguistic and paralinguistic (intonational, prosodic, etc.) features contained within the speech signal. However, most functional neuroimaging studies of(More)
Focal brain lesions are assumed to produce language deficits by two basic mechanisms: local cortical dysfunction at the lesion site, and remote cortical dysfunction due to disruption of the transfer and integration of information between connected brain regions. However, functional imaging studies investigating language outcome after aphasic stroke have(More)
The dorsal bank of the primate superior temporal sulcus (STS) is a polysensory area with rich connections to unimodal sensory association cortices. These include auditory projections that process complex acoustic information, including conspecific vocalizations. We investigated whether an extensive left posterior temporal (Wernicke's area) lesion, which(More)
There have been many functional imaging studies that have investigated the neural correlates of speech perception by contrasting neural responses to speech and "speech-like" but unintelligible control stimuli. A potential drawback of this approach is that intelligibility is necessarily conflated with a change in the acoustic parameters of the stimuli. The(More)
We compared brain structure and function in two subgroups of 21 stroke patients with either moderate or severe chronic speech comprehension impairment. Both groups had damage to the supratemporal plane; however, the severe group suffered greater damage to two unimodal auditory areas: primary auditory cortex and the planum temporale. The effects of this(More)
Constructional apraxia refers to the inability of patients to copy accurately drawings or three-dimensional constructions. It is a common disorder after right parietal stroke, often persisting after initial problems such as visuospatial neglect have resolved. However, there has been very little experimental investigation regarding mechanisms that might(More)
Age has a differential effect on cognition, with word retrieval being one of the cognitive domains most affected by aging. This study examined the functional and structural neural correlates of phonological word retrieval in younger and older adults using word and picture rhyme judgment tasks. Although the behavioral performance in the fMRI task was similar(More)
PURPOSE OF REVIEW The evidence base for the treatment of poststroke aphasia continues to grow, so too does interest in the neural mechanisms that underlie these therapy-driven improvements. Although the majority of patients respond to therapy, not all of those who do improve do so in a predictable way. Here, we review 17 of the most recent articles that(More)
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