Jennifer J. Argo

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Two field studies investigate the importance of social presence (real and imagined) and famiiiarity whti the purchase act in producing embarrassment in the context ot an embarrassing product purchase. The results indicate tbat awareness of a social presence during purchase selection and commitment, whether real or imagined, is a motivating factor in(More)
Effective social interactions require the ability to evaluate other people's actions and intentions, sometimes only on the basis of such subtle factors as body language, and these evaluative judgments may lead to powerful impressions. However, little is known about the impact of affective body language on evaluative responses in social settings and the(More)
From cooking kits to home improvement shows, consumers are increasingly seeking out products designed to help them be creative. In this research, the authors examine why consumers participate in creative activities and under what conditions these experiences are the most enjoyable. A qualitative study explores the diverse motivations for undertaking(More)
We show that minimal physical contact can increase people's sense of security and consequently lead them to increased risk-taking behavior. In three experiments, with both hypothetical and real payoffs, a female experimenter's light, comforting pat on the shoulder led participants to greater financial risk taking. Further, this effect was both mediated and(More)
This paper documents the multifaceted nature of pride in consumer behavior. Drawing on recent psychological research on pride, we provide evidence for two separate facets of pride in consumption. In a series of studies, we propose a model wherein luxury brand consumption and pride are systematically interrelated. Whereas authentic (but not hubristic) pride(More)
Dissociative versus Associative Responses to Social Identity Threat: The Role of Consumer Self-Construal Author(s): Katherine White, Jennifer J. Argo, and Jaideep Sengupta Reviewed work(s): Source: Journal of Consumer Research, Vol. 39, No. 4 (December 2012), pp. 704-719 Published by: The University of Chicago Press Stable URL:(More)
The ability to gauge social interactions is crucial in the assessment of others' intentions. Factors such as facial expressions and body language affect our decisions in personal and professional life alike (1). These "friend or foe" judgements are often based on first impressions, which in turn may affect our decisions to "approach or avoid". Previous(More)
We show that minimal physical contact can increase people’s sense of security and consequently lead them to increased risktaking behavior. In three experiments, with both hypothetical and real payoffs, a female experimenter’s light, comforting pat on the shoulder led participants to greater financial risk taking. Further, this effect was both mediated and(More)
Vol. XLVIII (August 2011), 741 –754 *Didem Kurt is a doctoral student (e-mail: dkurt@katz.pitt.edu), and J. Jeffrey Inman is Associate Dean for Research and Faculty and the Alfred Wesley Frey Professor of Marketing (e-mail: jinman@katz.pitt.edu), Katz Graduate School of Business, University of Pittsburgh. Jennifer J. Argo is Cormie Professor of Marketing,(More)
In their paper, Li, Gordon and Gelfand (this issue) introduced the Tightness–Looseness (T–L) framework to the consumer domain, and offered several ideas on how this framework could be applied to consumer behavior. In this commentary, we examine the T–L framework through the consumer lens and discuss how the uniqueness of the consumption context can refine(More)
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