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The fungal pathogen Candida albicans is frequently associated with catheter-based infections because of its ability to form resilient biofilms. Prior studies have shown that the transcription factor Bcr1 governs biofilm formation in an in vitro catheter model. However, the mechanistic role of the Bcr1 pathway and its relationship to biofilm formation in(More)
A biofilm is a surface-associated population of microorganisms embedded in a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances. Biofilms are a major natural growth form of microorganisms and the cause of pervasive device-associated infection. This report focuses on the biofilm matrix of Candida albicans, the major fungal pathogen of humans. We report here that(More)
A biofilm is an organized, resilient group of microbes in which individual cells acquire properties, such as drug resistance, that are distinct from those observed in suspension cultures. Here, we describe and analyze the transcriptional network controlling biofilm formation in the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans, whose biofilms are a major source of(More)
BACKGROUND Biofilms are surface-associated microbial communities with significant environmental and medical impact. Here, we focus on an adherence mechanism that permits biofilm formation by Candida albicans, the major invasive fungal pathogen of humans. RESULTS The Als surface-protein family has been implicated in biofilm formation, and we show that Als1(More)
Hwp1 is a well-characterized Candida albicans cell surface protein, expressed only on hyphae, that mediates tight binding to oral epithelial cells. Prior studies indicate that HWP1 expression is dependent upon Bcr1, a key regulator of biofilm formation. Here we test the hypothesis that Hwp1 is required for biofilm formation. In an in vitro model, the(More)
Medical device-associated infections involve the attachment of cells to a surface, production of an extracellular matrix and development of a mature biofilm. Many Candida albicans disease states involve biofilm growth. These infections have great impact on public health because organisms in biofilms exhibit dramatically reduced susceptibility to antifungal(More)
Fungal biofilms are a major cause of human mortality and are recalcitrant to most treatments due to intrinsic drug resistance. These complex communities of multiple cell types form on indwelling medical devices and their eradication often requires surgical removal of infected devices. Here we implicate the molecular chaperone Hsp90 as a key regulator of(More)
Biofilms are microbial communities, embedded in a polymeric matrix, growing attached to a surface. Nearly all device-associated infections involve growth in the biofilm life style. Biofilm communities have characteristic architecture and distinct phenotypic properties. The most clinically important phenotype involves extraordinary resistance to(More)
Candida infection of devices is common and invariably associated with biofilm growth. Exploratory microarray studies were undertaken to identify target genes associated with biofilm formation from an in vivo catheter model over time. We compared messenger RNA levels from Candida albicans grown in an in vivo central venous catheter biofilm model at 12 h(More)
Cell-substrate adherence is a fundamental property of microorganisms that enables them to exist in biofilms. Our study focuses on adherence of the fungal pathogen Candida albicans to one substrate, silicone, that is relevant to device-associated infection. We conducted a mutant screen with a quantitative flow-cell assay to identify thirty transcription(More)