Jeffrey T. Kiehl

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  • Co-Ordinating Lead, Author V Ramaswamy, +42 authors J Srinivasan
  • 2001
Contributing Authors R. Betts, R. Charlson, C. Chuang, J.S. Daniel, A. Del Genio, R. van Dorland, J. Feichter, J. Fuglestvedt, P.M. de F. Forster, S.J. Ghan, A. Jones, J.T. Kiehl, D. Koch, C. Land, J. Lean, U. Lohmann, K. Minschwaner, J.E. Penner, D.L. Roberts, H. Rodhe, G.J. Roelofs, L.D. Rotstayn, T.L. Schneider, U. Schumann, S.E. Schwartz, M.D.(More)
The Community Climate System Model version 3 (CCSM3) has recently been developed and released to the climate community. CCSM3 is a coupled climate model with components representing the atmosphere, ocean, sea ice, and land surface connected by a flux coupler. CCSM3 is designed to produce realistic simulations over a wide range of spatial resolutions,(More)
Human activities are releasing tiny particles (aerosols) into the atmosphere. These human-made aerosols enhance scattering and absorption of solar radiation. They also produce brighter clouds that are less efficient at releasing precipitation. These in turn lead to large reductions in the amount of solar irradiance reaching Earth's surface, a corresponding(More)
The Community Climate System Model, version 2 (CCSM2) is briefly described. A 1000-yr control simulation of the present day climate has been completed without flux adjustments. Minor modifications were made at year 350, which included all five components using the same physical constants. There are very small trends in the upper-ocean, sea ice, atmosphere,(More)
A new version of the Community Climate System Model (CCSM) has been developed and released to the climate community. CCSM3 is a coupled climate model with components representing the atmosphere, ocean, sea ice, and land surface connected by a flux coupler. CCSM3 is designed to produce realistic simulations over a wide range of spatial resolutions, enabling(More)
W eather and climate on Earth are determined by the amount and distribution of incoming radiation from the sun. For an equilibrium climate, OLR1 necessarily balances the incoming ASR, although there is a great deal of fascinating atmosphere, ocean, and land phenomena that couple the two. Incoming radiant energy may be scattered and reflected by clouds and(More)
The Climate System Model, a coupled global climate model without ‘‘flux adjustments’’ recently developed at the National Center for Atmospheric Research, was used to simulate the twentieth-century climate using historical greenhouse gas and sulfate aerosol forcing. This simulation was extended through the twenty-first century under two newly developed(More)
The Community Climate System Model (CCSM) has been created to represent the principal components of the climate system and their interactions. Development and applications of the model are carried out by the U.S. climate research community, thus taking advantage of both wide intellectual participation and computing capabilities beyond those available to(More)
Calculations of the effects of both natural and anthropogenic tropospheric sulfate aerosols indicate that the aerosol climate forcing is sufficiently large in a number of regions of the Northern Hemisphere to reduce significantly the positive forcing from increased greenhouse gases. Summer sulfate aerosol forcing in the Northern Hemisphere completely(More)