Jeffrey Rogers

Learn More
Countless millions of people have died from tuberculosis, a chronic infectious disease caused by the tubercle bacillus. The complete genome sequence of the best-characterized strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, H37Rv, has been determined and analysed in order to improve our understanding of the biology of this slow-growing pathogen and to help the(More)
Inflammation clearly occurs in pathologically vulnerable regions of the Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain, and it does so with the full complexity of local peripheral inflammatory responses. In the periphery, degenerating tissue and the deposition of highly insoluble abnormal materials are classical stimulants of inflammation. Likewise, in the AD brain damaged(More)
We describe a map of 1.42 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) distributed throughout the human genome, providing an average density on available sequence of one SNP every 1.9 kilobases. These SNPs were primarily discovered by two projects: The SNP Consortium and the analysis of clone overlaps by the International Human Genome Sequencing(More)
Only a small proportion of the mouse genome is transcribed into mature messenger RNA transcripts. There is an international collaborative effort to identify all full-length mRNA transcripts from the mouse, and to ensure that each is represented in a physical collection of clones. Here we report the manual annotation of 60,770 full-length mouse complementary(More)
The rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) is an abundant primate species that diverged from the ancestors of Homo sapiens about 25 million years ago. Because they are genetically and physiologically similar to humans, rhesus monkeys are the most widely used nonhuman primate in basic and applied biomedical research. We determined the genome sequence of an(More)
We have characterized amyloid beta peptide (Abeta) concentration, Abeta deposition, paired helical filament formation, cerebrovascular amyloid angiopathy, apolipoprotein E (ApoE) allotype, and synaptophysin concentration in entorhinal cortex and superior frontal gyrus of normal elderly control (ND) patients, Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients, and high(More)
We have previously developed and characterized isolated microglia and astrocyte cultures from rapid (<4 h) brain autopsies of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and nondemented elderly control (ND) patients. In the present study, we evaluate the inflammatory repertoire of AD and ND microglia cultured from white matter (corpus callosum) and gray matter (superior(More)
The higher plant Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) is an important model for identifying plant genes and determining their function. To assist biological investigations and to define chromosome structure, a coordinated effort to sequence the Arabidopsis genome was initiated in late 1996. Here we report one of the first milestones of this project, the(More)
Alzheimer disease (AD) is characterized by excessive deposition of the beta-amyloid peptide (beta-AP) in the central nervous system. Although several lines of evidence suggest that beta-AP is neurotoxic, a mechanism for beta-AP toxicity in AD brain remains unclear. In this paper we provide both direct in vitro evidence that beta-AP can bind and activate the(More)
Receptor-mediated interactions with amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta) could be important in the evolution of the inflammatory processes and cellular dysfunction that are prominent in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology. One candidate receptor is the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE), which can bind Abeta and transduce signals leading to cellular(More)