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The Performance Engineering Institute (PERI) originally proposed a tiger team activity as a mechanism to target significant effort optimizing key Office of Science applications, a model that was successfully realized with the assistance of two JOULE metric teams. However, the Office of Science requested a new focus beginning in 2008: assistance in forming(More)
Different kinds of protein (crude, digestible, non-digestible) were analysed in caps and stipe of Pleurotus ostreatus (oyster mushroom) in four phases of development. The phases examined were: a (cap diameter < 5 cm); B (diameter 5-8 cm); C (diameter, 8-10 cm) and D (diameter > 10 cm). The Pleurotus variety analysed (the cap and the stipe) has a relative(More)
  • J Vetter
  • 1993
A comparative analysis of crude protein, crude ash, phosphorus (P), potassium (K) and calcium (Ca) contents of 57 samples of eight common edible mushroom species was made. The most important protein sources were: Marasmius oreades and Lepista nebularis. Species of the Boletaceae formed an intermediate group, while relatively proteinless species were:(More)
  • J Vetter
  • 1994
Fifty six samples of edible, wide-spread species of higher fungi were analysed for copper-, manganese- and zinc-contents. The average copper concentration of the samples is high (56.16 mg/kg dry mass) as compared to the green plants. Some groups of fungi (Agaricus and Macrolepiota species) are considerable copper-accumulators (until 226 mg/kg DM).(More)
  • J Vetter
  • 1995
World wide about 200,000 tons of shii-take mushrooms (Lentinus edodes) are produced per year. Different positive biological effects are known (anticarcinogenic, anticholesterol, immunostimulating effects), but the mineral contents and amino acid composition of caps and stipes are still little investigated. The concentrations of minerals are in general lower(More)
Illustrations are frequently employed to support or amplify the textual content of an article. When illustrations fail to support the needs of the text, the result may be confusing and detrimental to the reader. Guidelines are presented to ensure that the illustration on the printed page provides all the visual information intended by the author.
  • J Vetter
  • 1994
The average potassium content of edible higher mushroom species is 34,35 g/kg-1 dry matter (SD: 12,91) and thus an important and valuable K-source for human diet. The K-concentration of mushrooms is relatively constant. An accumulation of potassium in the mushroom samples analysed was not found. This fact is confirmed by the results of other authors, too.