Jean-Philippe Bernardy

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We describe a systematic method to build a logic from any programming language described as a Pure Type System (PTS). The formulas of this logic express properties about programs. We define a parametricity theory about programs and a realizability theory for the logic. The logic is expressive enough to internalize both theories. Thanks to the PTS setting,(More)
Earlier studies have introduced a list of high-level evaluation criteria to assess how well a language supports generic programming. Since each language that meets all criteria is considered generic, those criteria are not fine-grained enough to differentiate between languages for generic programming. We refine these criteria into a taxonomy that captures(More)
Dependent type-theory aims to become the standard way to formalize mathematics at the same time as displacing traditional platforms for high-assurance programming. However, current implementations of type theory are still lacking, in the sense that some obvious truths require explicit proofs, making type-theory awkward to use for many applications, both in(More)
Structured documents are commonly edited using a free-form editor. Even though every string is an acceptable input, it makes sense to maintain a structured representation of the edited document. The structured representation has a number of uses: structural navigation (and optional structural editing), structure highlighting, etc. The construction of the(More)
Earlier studies have introduced a list of high-level evaluation criteria to assess how well a language supports generic programming. Languages that meet all criteria include Haskell, because of its type classes, and C++ with the concept feature. We refine these criteria into a taxonomy that captures com-monalities and differences between type classes in(More)
We present a divide-and-conquer algorithm for parsing context-free languages efficiently. Our algorithm is an instance of Valiant's (1975), who reduced the problem of parsing to matrix multiplications. We show that, while the conquer step of Valiant's is <i>O</i>(<i>n</i><sup>3</sup>) in the worst case, it improves to <i>O</i>(log<i>n</i><sup>3</sup>),(More)