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In-depth study of Mollivirus sibericum, a new 30,000-y-old giant virus infecting Acanthamoeba
TLDR
Mollivirus sibericum, a fourth type of giant virus, was isolated from the same permafrost sample and analyzed using a combination of “omic” approaches that revealed how the virus highjacks its host machinery to actively replicate.
Diversity and evolution of the emerging Pandoraviridae family
TLDR
It is suggested that de novo gene creation could contribute to the evolution of the giant pandoravirus genomes because most of the strain-specific genes have no extant homolog and exhibit statistical features comparable to intergenic regions.
Pandoravirus Celtis Illustrates the Microevolution Processes at Work in the Giant Pandoraviridae Genomes
TLDR
Comparison of the gene content of a new isolate of the Pandoraviridae family, closely related to the previously described p.
Exploration of the propagation of transpovirons within Mimiviridae reveals a unique example of commensalism in the viral world
TLDR
A canthamoeba -infecting Mimiviridae is isolated, highlighting a unique example of intricate commensalism in the viral world, where the transpoviron uses the virophage to propagate and where the Zamilon viroPHage and the transPoviron depend on the giant virus to replicate, without affecting its infectious cycle.
Characterization of Mollivirus kamchatka, the First Modern Representative of the Proposed Molliviridae Family of Giant Viruses
TLDR
Mollivirus kamchatka is described, a close relative to M. sibericum, previously isolated from 30,000-year-old arctic permafrost, confirming that molliviruses have not gone extinct and are at least present in a distant subarctic continental location.
The DNA methylation landscape of giant viruses
TLDR
It is shown that DNA methylation is widespread, affecting 2/3 of the tested families, although unevenly distributed, and evolutionary analysis of virus encoded DNA methyltransferases suggests that they affect viral fitness.
Characterization of Mollivirus kamchatka, the first modern representative of the proposed Molliviridae family of giant viruses
TLDR
Mollivirus kamchatka is described, a close relative to M. sibericum, isolated from surface soil sampled on the bank of the Kronotsky river in Kamchatka, confirming that molliviruses have not gone extinct and are at least present in a distant subarctic continental location.
The DNA Methylation Landscape of Giant Viruses
TLDR
It is shown that DNA methylation is widespread in giant viruses although unevenly distributed and identified the corresponding viral MTases, all of which are of bacterial origins and subject to intricate gene transfers between bacteria, viruses and their eukaryotic host.
Pandoravirus celtis illustrates the microevolution processes at work in the giant Pandoraviridae genomes
TLDR
This study unraveled several insertion events mediated by a transposase of the hAT family, 3 copies of which are found in P. celtis and are presumably active, and proposed that most new protein-coding genes were created de novo, from pre-existing non-c coding regions of the G+C rich pandoravirus genomes.
Commensalism in the Mimiviridae giant virus family
TLDR
This study highlights a unique example of intricate commensalism in the viral world, where the transpoviron uses the virophage to propagate from one host virus to another and where the Zamilon viro phages depend on their host giant virus to replicate, this without affecting the giant virus infectious cycle, at least in laboratory conditions.
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