Learn More
The SECURE project is investigating the design of security mechanisms for pervasive computing based on the human notion of trust. Our work addresses how entities that encounter each other in unfamiliar, pervasive computing environments can overcome initial suspicion to allow secure collaboration to take place. 1 Overview At present most substantial,(More)
The possibility of a massive, networked infrastructure of diverse entities partaking in collaborative applications with each other increases more and more with the proliferation of mobile devices and the development of ad hoc networking technologies. In this context, traditional security measures do not scale well. We aim to develop trust-based security(More)
The problem of identifying trustworthy information on the World Wide Web is becoming increasingly acute as new tools such as wikis and blogs simplify and democratize publications. Wikipedia is the most extraordinary example of this phenomenon and, although a few mechanisms have been put in place to improve contributions quality, trust in Wikipedia content(More)
—Cooperation incentives are essential in user-centric networks to motivate users to share services and resources (including bandwidth, computational power, and storage space) and to avoid selfish nodes to hinder the functioning of the entire system. Virtual currency and reputation mechanisms are commonly adopted in online communities to boost participation,(More)
The proliferation of mobile devices and the development of ad hoc networking technologies has introduced the possibility of a vast, networked infrastructure of diverse entities partaking in collaborative applications with each other. However, this may require interaction between users who may be marginally or completely unknown to each other, or interaction(More)
Pervasive computing requires some level of trust to be established between entities. In this paper we argue for an entity recognition based approach to building this trust which differs from starting from more traditional authentication methods. We also argue for the concept of a " pluggable " recognition module which allows different recognition schemes to(More)
Computational models of trust have been proposed for use in ubicomp environments for deciding whether to allow customers to pay with an e-purse or not. In order to build trust in a customer, a means to link transactions using the same e-purse is required. Roughly, trust is a result of knowledge. As the number of transactions increases, the resulting(More)