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Small effect of interline spacing on maximal reading speed in low-vision patients with central field loss irrespective of scotoma size.
TLDR
Vertical crowding does not seem to be a major determinant of maximal reading speed for patients with central scotomas, and increasing interline spacing is advisable only for very slow readers who want to read a few words (spot reading). Expand
The dependence of crowding on flanker complexity and target-flanker similarity.
TLDR
These findings, combined with the current understanding of the faulty feature integration account of crowding, provide some constraints of how the feature integration process could cause perceptual errors. Expand
Eye movements and reading speed in macular disease: the shrinking perceptual span hypothesis requires and is supported by a mediation analysis.
TLDR
Reading speed decreases with the average number of letters traversed on each forward saccade, an effect fully mediated by the total number of fixations, consistent with the shrinking perceptual span hypothesis. Expand
Page mode reading with simulated scotomas: A modest effect of interline spacing on reading speed
TLDR
Examining the dependence of page mode reading performance (speed and accuracy) on interline spacing suggested either that vertical crowding is minimized when reading meaningful sentences, or that the interaction between crowding and other factors such as attention and/or visuo-motor control is dependent on the paradigm used to assess reading speed. Expand
Can reading-specific training stimuli improve the effect of perceptual learning on peripheral reading speed?
TLDR
The findings confirm the possibility of increasing the size of the visual span and reading speed in the normal periphery with perceptual learning, and suggest that the benefits of training on letter recognition and maximum reading speed may not be linked to the types of letter strings presented during training. Expand
Clustering of Eye Fixations: A New Oculomotor Determinant of Reading Speed in Maculopathy.
TLDR
The NUF factor is a new oculomotor predictor of reading speed that is independent of the effect of L/FS and might be enhanced if new visual aids or automatic text simplification were used to reduce the occurrence of fixation clustering. Expand
A New Font, Specifically Designed for Peripheral Vision, Improves Peripheral Letter and Word Recognition, but Not Eye-Mediated Reading Performance
TLDR
A new font is designed in this study in order to reduce inter-letter similarity and consequently to increase peripheral letter recognition performance and this font significantly decreased perceptual errors in peripheral crowded letter recognition and in peripheral word recognition. Expand
A Model of Optimal Oculomotor Strategies in Reading for Normal and Damaged Visual Fields
TLDR
An ideal observer analysis of single word reading in normal readers and central scotoma patients is presented and the spatio-temporal pattern of saccades is predicted in terms of pixels to contrast theories that are impossible to compare using the traditional letter-slot approaches to modelling reading. Expand
Wet versus dry age-related macular degeneration in patients with central field loss: different effects on maximum reading speed.
TLDR
The wet/dry difference is a major finding that may result from the different time courses of the two types of disease, thus involving different types of visuomotor and attentional adaptation processes. Expand
The effect of letter-stroke boldness on reading speed in central and peripheral vision
TLDR
The results suggest that contrary to the popular belief, reading speed does not benefit from bold text in the normal fovea and periphery, and excessive increase in stroke boldness may even impair reading speed, especially in the periphery. Expand
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