Jay Walter Larson

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The Common Component Architecture (CCA) provides a means for software developers to manage the complexity of large-scale scientific simulations and to move toward a plug-and-play environment for high-performance computing. In the scientific computing context, component models also promote collaboration using independently developed software, thereby(More)
Many problems in science and engineering are best simulated as a set of mutually interacting models, resulting in a coupled or multiphysics model. These models present challenges stemming from their interdisciplinary nature and from their computational and algorithmic complexities. The computational complexity of individual models, combined with the(More)
Coupled climate models are large, multiphysics applications designed to simulate the Earth’s climate and predict the response of the climate to any changes in the forcing or boundary conditions. The Community Climate System Model (CCSM) is a widely used state-of-the-art climate model that has released several versions to the climate community over the past(More)
The Model Coupling Toolkit (MCT) is a software library for constructing parallel coupled models from individual parallel models. MCT was created to address the challenges of creating a parallel coupler for the Community Climate System Model (CCSM). Each of the submodels that make up CCSM is a separate parallel application with its own domain decomposition,(More)
With the increasing availability of high-performance massively parallel computer systems, the prevalence of sophisticated scientific simulation has grown rapidly. The complexity of the scientific models being simulated has also evolved, leading to a variety of coupled multi-physics simulation codes. Such cooperating parallel programs require fundamentally(More)
With the increasing availability of high-performance massively parallel computer systems, the prevalence of sophisticated scientific simulation has grown rapidly. The complexity of the scientific models being simulated has also evolved, leading to a variety of coupled multi-physics simulation codes. Such cooperating parallel programs require fundamentally(More)
1 Mathematics and Computer Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL, [mcinnes,benson,larson,norris]@mcs.anl.gov 2 Scalable Computing R & D, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Livermore, CA, [baallan,rob]@ca.sandia.gov 3 Computer Science and Mathematics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, [bernholdtde,kohlja]@ornl.gov 4(More)
Earth system and environmental models present the scientist/programmer with multiple challenges in software design, development, and maintenance, overall system integration, and performance. We describe how work in the industrial sector of software engineering—namely component-based software engineering—can be brought to bear to address issues of software(More)
Model coupling is a well-known method employed to simulate complex multiphysics and multiscale phenomena. Approaches have concentrated on coupling parallel models involving static data distribution among processes without the consideration of top-level dynamic load balancing. Malleability, the ability to change during execution the number of processes in an(More)