Javier Jaimovich

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'Emotion in Motion' is an experiment designed to understand the emotional reaction of people to a variety of musical excerpts, via self-report questionnaires and the recording of electrodermal activity (EDA) and heart rate (HR) signals. The experiment ran for 3 months as part of a public exhibition, having nearly 4000 participants and over 12000 listening(More)
In order to further understand our emotional reaction to music, a museum-based installation was designed to collect physiological and self-report data from people listening to music. This demo will describe the technical implementation of this installation as a tool for collecting large samples of data in public spaces. The Emotion in Motion terminal is(More)
Previously the design of algorithms and parameter calibration for biosignal music performances has been based on testing with a small number of individuals-in fact usually the performer themselves. This paper uses the data collected from over 4000 people to begin to create a truly robust set of algorithms for heart rate and electrodermal activity measures,(More)
Musical and performance experiences are often described as evoking powerful emotions, both in the listener/observer and player/performer. There is a significant body of literature describing these experiences along with related work examining physiological changes in the body during music listening and the physiological correlates of emotional state.(More)
The past decade has seen an increase of low-cost technology for sensor data acquisition, which has been utilized for the expanding field of research in gesture measurement for music performance. Unfortunately, these devices are still far from being compatible with the audiovisual recording platforms which have been used to record synchronized streams of(More)
Over the past four years Emotion in Motion, a long running experiment, has amassed the world's largest database of human physiology associated with emotion in response to the presentation of various selections of musical works. What began as a doctoral research study of participants in Dublin, Ireland, and New York City has grown to include over ten(More)
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