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Linking Cognitive Science to Education: Generation and Interleaving Effects
Linking Cognitive Science to Education: Generation and Interleaving Effects Lindsey E. Richland (Lengle@psych.ucla.edu) Department of Psychology, UCLA Los Angeles, CA 90095 Robert A. Bjork
Comparing faculty information seeking in teaching and research: Implications for the design of digital libraries
TLDR
It is found that geography faculty are more likely to encounter useful teaching resources while seeking research resources than vice versa, although the influence goes in both directions.
The effects of end-of-day picture review and a sensor-based picture capture procedure on autobiographical memory using SenseCam
TLDR
The promise of SenseCam is discussed as a tool for research and for improving autobiographical memory, and end-of-day review enhanced performance relative to no review, while pictures triggered by SenseCam's sensors showed little difference in performance compared to those taken at fixed time intervals.
Metacognition of the testing effect: Guiding learners to predict the benefits of retrieval
TLDR
It is shown that under judicious conditions, learners can indeed reveal an understanding of the beneficial effects of testing, as well as the interaction of that effect with delay, and that learners’ global naïve metacognitive beliefs increasingly reflect the beneficial results of testing when learners experience these benefits with increasing external support.
Metacognition of multitasking: How well do we predict the costs of divided attention?
TLDR
The combination of results suggests that people do anticipate costs of multitasking, but have little metacognitive insight on the extent to which they are personally vulnerable to the risks of divided attention, relative to other people.
Adaptive and qualitative changes in encoding strategy with experience: evidence from the test-expectancy paradigm.
TLDR
Three experiments demonstrated learners' abilities to adaptively and qualitatively accommodate their encoding strategies to the demands of an upcoming test, illustrating a sophisticated form of metacognitive control, in which learners qualitatively shift encode strategies to match the demandsof anticipated tests.
Benefits from retrieval practice are greater for students with lower working memory capacity
TLDR
Final cued recall performance was better for tested items than for restudied items after both 10 minutes and 2 days, particularly for longer study–test lags.
Extending Cognition to External Agents
Sparrow and Chatman ask if extending social cognition in the Internet age is “the same as it ever was” or whether, due to Google and other search engines on the Internet, something fundamentally
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