Jason Newton

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There have been numerous recent observations of changes in the behavior and dynamics of migratory bird populations, but the plasticity of the migratory trait and our inability to track small animals over large distances have hindered investigation of the mechanisms behind migratory change. We used habitat-specific stable isotope signatures to show that(More)
Ecological divergence has a central role in speciation and is therefore an important source of biodiversity. Studying the micro-evolutionary processes of ecological diversification at its early stages provides an opportunity for investigating the causative mechanisms and ecological conditions promoting divergence. Here we use morphological traits, nitrogen(More)
Until recently, the study of negative and antagonistic interactions (for example, competition and predation) has dominated our understanding of community structure, maintenance and assembly. Nevertheless, a recent theoretical model suggests that positive interactions (for example, mutualisms) may counterbalance competition, facilitating long-term(More)
When species occupy habitats that vary in quality, choice of habitat can be critical in determining individual fitness. In most migratory species, juveniles migrate independently of their parents and must therefore choose both breeding and winter habitats. Using a unique dataset of marked black-tailed godwits (Limosa limosa islandica) tracked throughout(More)
Tool use is so rare in the animal kingdom that its evolutionary origins cannot be traced with comparative analyses. Valuable insights can be gained from investigating the ecological context and adaptive significance of tool use under contemporary conditions, but obtaining robust observational data is challenging. We assayed individual-level tool-use(More)
Teeth from male sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus) stranded in the North-eastern Atlantic were used to determine whether chronological profiles of stable isotope ratios of C (δ13C) and N (δ15N) across dentine growth layers could be used to detect known ontogenetic benchmarks in movements and trophic ecology. Profiles showed a general decrease in δ13C(More)
Many established models of animal foraging assume that individuals are ecologically equivalent. However, it is increasingly recognized that populations may comprise individuals who differ consistently in their diets and foraging behaviors. For example, recent studies have shown that individual foraging site fidelity (IFSF, when individuals consistently(More)
Phenotypic variation in populations of fishes that inhabit postglacial lakes is often associated with trophic specialisations. A common sympatric foraging divergence seen in Arctic charr is into either plankton or littoral-zoobenthos feeding specialisms. In this study, we report a sympatric polymorphic Arctic charr population which is not centred on this(More)