Jarno Nousiainen

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—We study the maximum forwarding capacity for the relay traffic that can be transmitted through a wireless multihop network in a single direction. The problem appears as the microscopic level problem in a dense multihop network where the routing and forwarding tasks can be considered independently (separation of scales). Ultimately, the problem of finding(More)
We study the maximal forwarding capacity of a massively dense wireless multi-hop network where a typical path consists of a vast number of hops. In such a network, the macroscopic level, corresponding to the scale of an end-to-end path, and the microscopic level, corresponding to the scale of a single hop, can be separated. At the macroscopic level the task(More)
—We study the maximum weight independent sets of links between nodes distributed as a spatial Poisson process in an infinite plane. Three different definitions of the weight of a link are considered, leading to slight variations of what is essentially a spatial reuse problem in wireless multihop networks. A simple Boolean interference model is assumed with(More)
We study the maximum weight independent sets of links between nodes distributed randomly in an infinite plane. Different definitions of the weight of a link are considered, leading to slight variations of what is essentially a spatial reuse problem in wireless multi-hop networks. A simple interference model is assumed with the interference radius equaling(More)
We consider the problem of finding the maximum directed packet flow that can be sustained in an infinite wireless multihop network. This ability of the network to relay traffic is called the forwarding capacity, and the problem appears when the spatial scales corresponding to the end-to-end paths (routing) and the neighboring nodes (forwarding) are strongly(More)
—Spatial reuse is a key aspect of wireless network design, and the choice of an appropriate interference model is important for capturing the intrinsic characteristics of such a network. We address the problem of finding optimal transmission modes, and their capacities, in a network consisting of nodes distributed as a spatial Poisson process in an infinite(More)
—The problem of the capacity of a massively dense wireless multihop network can be broken down into separate problems at macroscopic and microscopic levels. At the microscopic level, from the local perspective, the network appears like an infinite plane with traffic that is uniform but flowing in many directions. Previous studies have assumed that it is(More)
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