Harold F. Dvorak7
Ann M. Dvorak3
Lawrence F. Brown2
Dian Feng2
Eleanor J. Manseau2
7Harold F. Dvorak
3Ann M. Dvorak
2Lawrence F. Brown
2Dian Feng
2Eleanor J. Manseau
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Circulating leukocytes are thought to extravasate from venules through open interendothelial junctions. To test this paradigm, we injected N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP) intradermally in guinea pigs, harvesting tissue at 5-60 min. At FMLP-injected sites, venular endothelium developed increased surface wrinkling and variation in thickness.(More)
The vascular system has the critical function of supplying tissues with nutrients and clearing waste products. To accomplish these goals, the vasculature must be sufficiently permeable to allow the free, bidirectional passage of small molecules and gases and, to a lesser extent, of plasma proteins. Physiologists and many vascular biologists differ as to the(More)
Vascular permeability factor/vascular endothelial growth factor (VPF/VEGF, VEGF-A) is a multifunctional cytokine with important roles in pathological angiogenesis. Using an adenoviral vector engineered to express murine VEGF-A(164), we previously investigated the steps and mechanisms by which this cytokine induced the formation of new blood vessels in adult(More)
Therapies directed against VEGF-A and its receptors are effective in treating many mouse tumors but have been less so in treating human cancer patients. To elucidate the reasons that might be responsible for this difference in response, we investigated the nature of the blood vessels that appear in human and mouse cancers and the tumor “surrogate” blood(More)
Lymphatic vessel growth, or lymphangiogenesis, is regulated by vascular endothelial growth factor-C (VEGF-C) and -D via VEGF receptor 3 (VEGFR-3). Recent studies suggest that VEGF, which does not bind to VEGFR-3, can also induce lymphangiogenesis through unknown mechanisms. To dissect the receptor pathway that triggers VEGFR-3-independent lymphangiogenesis,(More)
  • Sung-Hee Chang, Keizo Kanasaki, Vasilena Gocheva, Galia Blum, Jay Harper, Marsha A Moses +6 others
  • 2009
Tumors initiate angiogenesis primarily by secreting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-A(164)). The first new vessels to form are greatly enlarged, pericyte-poor sinusoids, called mother vessels (MV), that originate from preexisting venules. We postulated that the venular enlargement necessary to form MV would require a selective degradation of their(More)
Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A has essential roles in vasculogenesis and angiogenesis, but the downstream steps and mechanisms by which human VEGF-A acts are incompletely understood. We report here that human VEGF-A exerts much of its angiogenic activity by up-regulating the expression of TR3 (mouse homologue Nur77), an immediate-early response(More)
BACKGROUND Successful neovascularization requires that sprouting endothelial cells (ECs) integrate to form new vascular networks. However, architecturally defective, poorly integrated vessels with blind ends are typical of pathological angiogenesis induced by vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF), thereby limiting the utility of VEGF for therapeutic(More)
Mechanisms governing the distinct temporal dynamics that characterize post-natal angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis elicited by cutaneous wounds and inflammation remain unclear. RhoB, a stress-induced small GTPase, modulates cellular responses to growth factors, genotoxic stress and neoplastic transformation. Here we show, using RhoB null mice, that loss of(More)
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