Learn More
Type Three Secretion Systems (T3SSs) are essential virulence determinants of many Gram-negative bacteria. The T3SS is an injection device that can transfer bacterial virulence proteins directly into host cells. The apparatus is made up of a basal body that spans both bacterial membranes and an extracellular needle that possesses a channel that is thought to(More)
The complement system is an essential component of the innate and acquired immune system, and consists of a series of proteolytic cascades that are initiated by the presence of microorganisms. In health, activation of complement is precisely controlled through membrane-bound and soluble plasma-regulatory proteins including complement factor H (fH; ref. 2),(More)
Recent work by several groups has significantly expanded our knowledge of the structure, regulation of assembly, and function of components of the extracellular portion of the type III secretion system (T3SS) of Gram-negative bacteria. This perspective presents a structure-informed analysis of functional data and discusses three nonmutually exclusive models(More)
Bacteria expressing type III secretion systems (T3SS) have been responsible for the deaths of millions worldwide, acting as key virulence elements in diseases ranging from plague to typhoid fever. The T3SS is composed of a basal body, which traverses both bacterial membranes, and an external needle through which effector proteins are secreted. We report(More)
Type III secretion systems are essential virulence determinants for many Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. The type III secretion system consists of cytoplasmic, transmembrane, and extracellular domains. The extracellular domain is a hollow needle protruding above the bacterial surface and is held within a basal body that traverses both bacterial(More)
Type III secretion systems (T3SSs) are bacterial membrane-embedded nanomachines designed to export specifically targeted proteins from the bacterial cytoplasm. Secretion through T3SS is governed by a subset of inner membrane proteins termed the 'export apparatus'. We show that a key member of the Shigella flexneri export apparatus, MxiA, assembles into a(More)
The loading of peptide Ags onto MHC class I molecules is a highly controlled process in which the MHC class I-dedicated chaperone tapasin is a key player. We recently identified a tapasin-related molecule, TAPBPR, as an additional component in the MHC class I Ag-presentation pathway. In this study, we show that the amino acid residues important for tapasin(More)
Many Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria use a complex macromolecular machine, known as the type 3 secretion system (T3SS), to transfer virulence proteins into host cells. The T3SS is composed of a cytoplasmic bulb, a basal body spanning the inner and outer bacterial membranes, and an extracellular needle. Secretion is regulated by both cytoplasmic and inner(More)
The pathogenic bacterium Shigella flexneri uses a type III secretion system to inject virulence factors from the bacterial cytosol directly into host cells. The machinery that identifies secretion substrates and controls the export of extracellular components and effector proteins consists of several inner-membrane and cytoplasmic proteins. One of the inner(More)
Many Gram-negative pathogens translocate virulence proteins directly into host cells using a type III secretion system. This complex secretion machinery is composed of approximately 25 different proteins that assemble to span both bacterial membranes, and contact the host cell to form a direct channel between the bacterial and host cell cytoplasms. Assembly(More)