Janet Anders

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We introduce a new paradigm for quantum computing called Ancilla-Driven Quantum Computation (ADQC) combines aspects of the quantum circuit [1] and the one-way model [2] to overcome challenging issues in building large-scale quantum computers. Instead of directly manipulating each qubit to perform universal quantum logic gates or measurements, ADQC uses a(More)
We introduce a new paradigm for quantum computing called Ancilla-Driven Quantum Computation (ADQC) which combines aspects both of the quantum circuit [1] and the one-way model [2] to overcome challenging issues in building large-scale quantum computers. Instead of directly manipulating each qubit to perform universal quantum logic gates or measurements,(More)
In this article we extend on work which establishes an analogy between one-way quantum computation and thermodynamics to see how the former can be performed on fractal lattices. We find fractals lattices of arbitrary dimension greater than one which do all act as good resources for one-way quantum computation, and sets of fractal lattices with dimension(More)
Recent papers discussing thermodynamic processes in strongly coupled quantum systems claim a violation of Landauer's principle and imply a violation of the second law of thermodynamics [1, 2, 3, 4]. If true, this would have powerful consequences. Perpetuum mobiles could be build as long as the operating temperature is brought close to zero. It would also(More)
We present a general sufficiency condition for the presence of multipartite entangle-ment in thermal states stemming from the ground state entanglement. The condition is written in terms of the ground state entanglement and the partition function and it gives transition temperatures below which entanglement is guaranteed to survive. It is flexible and can(More)
We present a general argument showing that the temperature as well as other thermodynamical state variables qualify as entanglement witnesses for spatial entanglement. This holds for a variety of systems and we exemplify our ideas using a simple non-interacting Bosonic gas. We find that entanglement can exist at arbitrarily high temperatures, provided that(More)