Jane H Buckner

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CD4+CD25+ regulatory T (TR) cells have been described in both humans and mice. In mice, TR are thymically derived, and lack of TR leads to organ-specific autoimmunity. Recently, the forkhead/winged helix transcription factor, FoxP3, has been shown to be important for the function of TR cells in mice. In this study, human TR cells were examined and, in(More)
A lack of regulatory T (T(Reg)) cells that express CD4, CD25 and forkhead box P3 (FOXP3) results in severe autoimmunity in both mice and humans. Since the discovery of T(Reg) cells, there has been intense investigation aimed at determining how they protect an organism from autoimmunity and whether defects in their number or function contribute to the(More)
OBJECTIVE In humans, multiple genes in the interleukin (IL)-2/IL-2 receptor (IL-2R) pathway are associated with type 1 diabetes. However, no link between IL-2 responsiveness and CD4(+)CD25(+)FOXP3(+) regulatory T-cells (Tregs) has been demonstrated in type 1 diabetic subjects despite the role of these IL-2-dependent cells in controlling autoimmunity. Here,(More)
Complement receptor 2-negative (CR2/CD21(-)) B cells have been found enriched in patients with autoimmune diseases and in common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) patients who are prone to autoimmunity. However, the physiology of CD21(-/lo) B cells remains poorly characterized. We found that some rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients also display an increased(More)
Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease that occurs in genetically susceptible individuals. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been shown to be defective in the autoimmune disease setting. Thus, efforts to repair or replace Tregs in T1D may reverse autoimmunity and protect the remaining insulin-producing β cells. On the basis of this premise, a robust(More)
Defects in immune regulation have been implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetes in mouse and in man. In vitro assays using autologous regulatory (Treg) and responder effector (Teff) T cells have shown that suppression is impaired in diabetic subjects. In this study, we addressed whether the source of this defect is intrinsic to the Treg or Teff(More)
A variant of the PTPN22 gene, 1858C/T, is associated with an increased risk for the development of a wide array of autoimmune disorders. It is known that the protein tyrosine phosphatase Lyp encoded by this gene has an inhibitory effect on the proximal TCR signaling pathways. However, the consequences of carrying this variant and the mechanism by which it(More)
Antigen-specificity is a hallmark of adaptive T cell-mediated immune responses. CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (T(R)) also require activation through the T cell receptor for function. Although these cells require antigen-specific activation, they are generally able to suppress bystander T cell responses once activated. This raises the possibility that(More)
OBJECTIVE HLA-DRB1*1001 (DR1001) is a shared epitope allele associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The present study was undertaken to assess the capacity of DR1001 to accommodate citrulline in its binding pockets and to identify citrullinated T cell epitopes derived from joint-associated proteins. METHODS The binding of peptide derivatives containing(More)
Patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) manifest demyelination and neurodegeneration mediated in part by CD4(+) T cells that have escaped regulation. Resistance of pathogenic effector T cells (T(effs)) to suppression by regulatory T cells (T(regs)) has been demonstrated in several autoimmune diseases. Although impairment in T(reg) number and function has been(More)