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1 This section will offer a description of data sources that may be of interest to economists. The purpose is to describe what data are available from those sources, what questions can be addressed because of the unique features of the data, and how an interested reader can gain access to the data. Suggestions for data sources that might be discussed here(More)
This paper provides an empirical analysis of the association between corruption perception and the willingness to offer bribes, as well as of the influence of different sources of information on corruption perception in the Ukraine. The higher the perceived corruption in an organization, the more probable it is that a person dealing with that organization(More)
Mismeasurement of inflation is likely to be more severe in a transition economy than in a more stable environment. Reasonable estimates of the size of the inflationary bias in the Czech Republic suggest that conventionally reported declines in real output and living standards during the transition may be a statistical artifact rather than a real phenomenon.(More)
One of the most enduring debates in economics is whether financial development causes economic growth or whether it is a consequence of increased economic activity. Little research into this question, however has used a true causality framework. This paper fills this lacuna by using Granger-causality tests to provide evidence of a positive and significant(More)
Mismeasurement of inflation is likely to be more severe in a transition economy than in a more stable environment. Comparisons of self-reported changes in economic welfare with changes in incomes suggest that official Romanian inflation measures may be overstated by between 100 and 300 percent at a reported annual inflation rate of 40 per cent.
Substantial understatement of the degree of quality improvement during transition, and, therefore, a substantial overstatement of inflation rates has resulted in a serious downward bias in estimates of the rate of growth of post-communist economies. The move to free markets has apparently improved consumers' welfare more by improving what they can purchase(More)
A 2002 survey of 1089 Czechs and 501 Slovaks, as well as a more limited survey of Hungary, and Poland, indicates that an individual may evade taxes in part if he believes he is receiving substandard government services. We suggest that an individual's evaluation of the quality of government services is not influenced by his need to justify his evasion.(More)