James W A Allen

Learn More
Mia40-dependent disulphide bond exchange is used by animals, yeast, and probably plants for import of small, cysteine-rich proteins into the mitochondrial intermembrane space (IMS). During import, electrons are transferred from the imported substrate to Mia40 then, via the sulphydryl oxidase Erv1, into the respiratory chain. Curiously, however, there are(More)
Anaerobic ammonium oxidizing (anammox) bacteria may contribute up to 50% to the global nitrogen production, and are, thus, key players of the global nitrogen cycle. The molecular mechanism of anammox was recently elucidated and is suggested to proceed through a branched respiratory chain. This chain involves an exceptionally high number of c-type cytochrome(More)
Cytochrome cd(1) is a respiratory enzyme that catalyzes the physiological one-electron reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide. The enzyme is a dimer, each monomer containing one c-type cytochrome center and one active site d(1) heme. We present stopped-flow Fourier transform infrared data showing the formation of a stable ferric heme d(1)-NO complex (formally(More)
We present a 1.59-A resolution crystal structure of reduced Paracoccus pantotrophus cytochrome cd(1) with cyanide bound to the d(1) heme and His/Met coordination of the c heme. Fe-C-N bond angles are 146 degrees for the A subunit and 164 degrees for the B subunit of the dimer. The nitrogen atom of bound cyanide is within hydrogen bonding distance of(More)
In c-type cytochromes, heme becomes covalently attached to the polypeptide chain by a reaction between the vinyl groups of the heme and cysteine thiols from the protein. There are two such cytochromes in mitochondria: cytochrome c and cytochrome c(1). The heme attachment is a post-translational modification that is catalysed by different biogenesis proteins(More)
The c-type cytochromes are characterized by the covalent attachment of haem to the polypeptide via thioether bonds formed from haem vinyl groups and, normally, the thiols of two cysteines in a CXXCH motif. Intriguingly, the mitochondrial cytochromes c and c1 from two euglenids and the Trypanosomatidae contain only a single cysteine within the haem-binding(More)
c-Type cytochromes are characterized by covalent attachment of haem to protein through thioether bonds between the vinyl groups of the haem and the thiols of a CXXCH motif. Proteins of this type play crucial roles in the biochemistry of the nitrogen cycle. Many Gram-negative bacteria use the Ccm (cytochrome c maturation) proteins for the post-translational(More)
Each monomer of the dimeric cytochrome cd(1) nitrite reductase from Paracoccus pantotrophus contains two hemes: one c-type center and one noncovalently bound d(1) center. Potentiometric analysis at 20 degrees C shows substantial cooperativity between the two redox centers in terms of their joint co-reduction (or co-oxidation) at a single apparent potential(More)
c-Type cytochromes are characterized by covalent attachment of haem to protein through thioether bonds between the vinyl groups of the haem and the thiols of a Cys-Xaa-Xaa-Cys-His motif. Proteins of this type play crucial roles in the biochemistry of the nitrogen cycle. Many Gram-negative bacteria use the Ccm (cytochrome c maturation) proteins for the(More)
Paracoccus pantotrophus cytochrome cd(1) is a physiological nitrite reductase and an in vitro hydroxylamine reductase. The oxidised "as isolated" form of the enzyme has bis-histidinyl coordinated c-heme and upon reduction its coordination changes to histidine/methionine. Following treatment of reduced enzyme with hydroxylamine, a novel, oxidised, conformer(More)