James R Austgen

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Group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are G-coupled receptors that modulate synaptic activity. Previous studies have shown that Group I mGluRs are present in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), in which many visceral afferents terminate. Microinjection of selective Group I mGluR agonists into the NTS results in a depressor response and(More)
The nucleus tractus solitarii (nTS) is the primary termination and integration point for visceral afferents in the brain stem. Afferent glutamate release and its efficacy on postsynaptic activity within this nucleus are modulated by additional neuromodulators and transmitters, including serotonin (5-HT) acting through its receptors. The 5-HT(2) receptors in(More)
The nucleus tractus solitarius (nTS) of the brainstem receives sensory afferent inputs, processes that information, and sends projections to a variety of brain regions responsible for influencing autonomic and respiratory output. The nTS sends direct projections to the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM), an area important for cardiorespiratory reflexes(More)
Within the brain stem, the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) serves as a principal central site for sensory afferent integration from the cardiovascular and respiratory reflexes. Neuronal activity and synaptic transmission in the NTS are highly pliable and subject to neuromodulation. In the central nervous system, hydrogen sulfide (H₂S) is a gasotransmitter(More)
30 Within the brainstem, the nucleus tractus solitarii (nTS) serves as a principal central site for 31 sensory afferent integration from the cardiovascular and respiratory reflexes. Neuronal activity 32 and synaptic transmission in the nTS is highly pliable and subject to neuromodulation. In the 33 central nervous system, hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) is a(More)
Serotonin (5-Hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) and the 5-HT2 receptor modulate cardiovascular and autonomic function in part through actions in the nTS, the primary termination and integration point for cardiorespiratory afferents in the brainstem. In other brain regions, 5-HT2 receptors (5-HT2R) modify synaptic transmission directly, as well as through(More)
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