James P. Spottiswoode

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Decision Augmentation Theory (DAT) holds that humans integrate information obtained by anomaĆ lous cognition into the usual decision process. The result is that, to a statistical degree, such decisions are biased toward volitional outcomes. We introduce our model and show that the domain over which it is applicable is within a few standard deviations from(More)
Decision Augmentation Theory (DAT) holds that humans integrate information obtained by anomaĆ lous cognition into the usual decision process. The result is that, to a statistical degree, such decisions are biased toward volitional outcomes. We summarize our model and show that the domain over which it is applicable is within a few standard deviations from(More)
Decision Augmentation Theory (DAT) provides an informational mechanism for a class of anomalous mental phenomena which have hitherto been viewed as being caused by a forceĆlike mechanism. Under specifiable conditions, DAT's predictions for statistical anomalous perturbation databases are differĆ ent from those of all forceĆlike mechanisms. For large random(More)
We propose that the average total change of Shannon's entropy is a candidate for an intrinsic target property. We analyze the results of two lengthy experiments that were conducted from 1992 through 1993 and find a significant correlation (Spearman's r = 0.337, df = 31, t = 1.99, p 0.028) with an absolute measure of the quality of the anomalous cognition.(More)
We have conducted an independent analysis of the worldwide network of random number generators called EGG's by the Global Consciousness Project (GCP) personnel. At the time we found direct contradictory statements with regard to the proper protocol between a published account and an account posted on the GCP web site http://noosphere.princeton.edu.(More)
Efforts to establish whether a correlation between anomalous cognition (AC) performance and geomagnetic fluctuations exists have met with mixed results, a negative correlation being seen in some studies and not in other comparable ones. Confirming this observation, in a large database of 2,879 free-response trials the Spearman's ρ correlation between the ap(More)
We describe a method of quantifying the effect of Questionable Research Practices (QRPs) on the results of meta-analyses. As an example we simulated a meta-analysis of a controversial telepathy protocol to assess the extent to which these experimental results could be explained by QRPs. Our simulations used the same numbers of studies and trials as the(More)
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