James P M Syvitski

Learn More
Here we provide global estimates of the seasonal flux of sediment, on a river-by-river basis, under modern and prehuman conditions. Humans have simultaneously increased the sediment transport by global rivers through soil erosion (by 2.3 +/- 0.6 billion metric tons per year), yet reduced the flux of sediment reaching the world's coasts (by 1.4 +/- 0.3(More)
A new model for predicting the long-term flux of sediment from river basins to the coastal ocean is applied to a global data set of 340 river basins. The model is based on relief, basin area (or, averaged discharge), and basin-averaged temperature. Basin-averaged temperature is determined from basin location (latitude, longitude) and the lapse rate across(More)
We evaluate the boundary of the Anthropocene geological time interval as an epoch, since it is useful to have a consistent temporal definition for this increasingly used unit, whether the presently informal term is eventually formalized or not. Of the three main levels suggested e an 'early Anthropocene' level some thousands of years ago; the beginning of(More)
Many scientists are making the case that humanity is living in a new geological epoch, the Anthropocene, but there is no agreement yet as to when this epoch began. The start might be defined by a historical event, such as the beginning of the fossil-fueled Industrial Revolution or the first nuclear explosion in 1945. Standard strati-graphic practice,(More)
  • 1