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In 1997, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) initiated a process to select a symmetric-key encryption algorithm to be used to protect sensitive (unclassified) Federal information in furtherance of NIST's statutory responsibilities. In 1998, NIST announced the acceptance of 15 candidate algorithms and requested the assistance of the(More)
The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) opened a public competition on November 2, 2007 to develop a new cryptographic hash algorithm – SHA-3, which will augment the hash algorithms currently specified in the Federal Information Processing Standard (FIPS) 180-3, Secure Hash Standard. The competition was NIST's response to advances in the(More)
The National Institute of Standards and Technology is in the process of selecting a new cryptographic hash algorithm through a public competition. The new hash algorithm will be referred to as " SHA-3 " and will complement the SHA-2 hash algorithms currently specified in FIPS 180-3, Secure Hash Standard. In October, 2008, 64 candidate algorithms were(More)
In 1997, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) initiated a process to select a symmetric-key encryption algorithm to be used to protect sensitive (unclassified) Federal information in furtherance of NIST's statutory responsibilities. In 1998, NIST announced the acceptance of 15 candidate algorithms and requested the assistance of the(More)
The National Institute of Standards and Technology is in the process of selecting a new cryptographic hash algorithm through a public competition. The new hash algorithm will be referred to as " SHA-3 " and will complement the SHA-2 hash algorithms currently specified in FIPS 180-3, Secure Hash Standard. In October, 2008, 64 candidate algorithms were(More)
We demonstrate a novel all-optical quantum random number generator (RNG) based on above-threshold binary phase state selection in a degenerate optical parametric oscillator (OPO). Photodetection is not a part of the random process, and no post processing is required for the generated bit sequence. We show that the outcome is statistically random with 99%(More)