James J. Foti

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In 1997, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) initiated a process to select a symmetric-key encryption algorithm to be used to protect sensitive (unclassified) Federal information in furtherance of NIST's statutory responsibilities. In 1998, NIST announced the acceptance of 15 candidate algorithms and requested the assistance of the(More)
A detailed understanding of the mechanisms that underlie antibiotic killing is important for the derivation of new classes of antibiotics and clinically useful adjuvants for current antimicrobial therapies. Our efforts to understand why DinB (DNA polymerase IV) overproduction is cytotoxic to Escherichia coli led to the unexpected insight that oxidation of(More)
To define factors in E. coli promoting survival to replication fork stress, we isolated insertion mutants sensitive to replication inhibitors. One insertion caused partial loss of the universally conserved GTPase, obgE/yhbZ gene. Although obgE is essential for growth, our insertion allele supported viability until challenged with various replication(More)
National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-0001 In 1997, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) initiated a process to select a symmetric-key encryption algorithm to be used to protect sensitive (unclassified) Federal information in furtherance of NIST’s statutory responsibilities. In 1998, NIST announced the(More)
Escherichia coli DinB (DNA polymerase IV) possesses an enzyme architecture resulting in specialized lesion bypass function and the potential for creating -1 frameshifts in homopolymeric nucleotide runs. We have previously shown that the mutagenic potential of DinB is regulated by the DNA damage response protein UmuD(2). In the current study, we employ a(More)
Escherichia coli cells depleted of the conserved GTPase, ObgE, show early chromosome-partitioning defects and accumulate replicated chromosomes in which the terminus regions are colocalized. Cells lacking ObgE continue to initiate replication, with a normal ratio of the origin to terminus. Localization of the SeqA DNA binding protein, normally seen as(More)
All organisms possess a diverse set of genetic programs that are used to alter cellular physiology in response to environmental cues. The gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli induces a gene regulatory network known as the "SOS response" following exposure to DNA damage, replication fork arrest, and a myriad of other environmental stresses. For over 50(More)
DinB, the E. coli translesion synthesis polymerase, has been shown to bypass several N2-alkylguanine adducts in vitro, including N2-furfurylguanine, the structural analog of the DNA adduct formed by the antibacterial agent nitrofurazone. Recently, it was demonstrated that the Fe(II)- and α-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase AlkB, a DNA repair enzyme, can(More)
We show that Escherichia coli DinB polymerase, which creates single-base deletions, prefers to extend slipped DNA substrates with the skipped base at the -4 position. A DinB(Y79L) variant, which extends these substrates less efficiently in vitro, allows the proofreading function of polymerase III to reverse their formation in vivo.