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We study rare events data, binary dependent variables with dozens to thousands of times fewer ones (events, such as wars, vetoes, cases of political activism, or epidemiological infections) than zeros (" nonevents "). In many literatures, these variables have proven difficult to explain and predict, a problem that seems to have at least two sources. First,(More)
  • James H Fowler, Tracy Burkett, Diane Felmlee, Jeff Gill, Ben Highton, Bob Huckfeldt +6 others
  • 2006
Using large-scale network analysis I map the cosponsorship networks of all 280,000 pieces of legislation proposed in the U.S. House and Senate from 1973 to 2004. In these networks, a directional link can be drawn from each cosponsor of a piece of legislation to its sponsor. I use a number of statistics to describe these networks such as the quantity of(More)
centered on a large database, but in this case it is entirely of living organisms, the marine bivalves. Over 28,000 records of bivalve gen-era and subgenera from 322 locations around the world have now been compiled by these authors, giving a global record of some 854 genera and subgenera and 5132 species. No fossils are included in the database, but(More)
BACKGROUND The prevalence of obesity has increased substantially over the past 30 years. We performed a quantitative analysis of the nature and extent of the person-to-person spread of obesity as a possible factor contributing to the obesity epidemic. METHODS We evaluated a densely interconnected social network of 12,067 people assessed repeatedly from(More)
OBJECTIVES To evaluate whether happiness can spread from person to person and whether niches of happiness form within social networks. DESIGN Longitudinal social network analysis. SETTING Framingham Heart Study social network. PARTICIPANTS 4739 individuals followed from 1983 to 2003. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Happiness measured with validated four item(More)
BACKGROUND The prevalence of smoking has decreased substantially in the United States over the past 30 years. We examined the extent of the person-to-person spread of smoking behavior and the extent to which groups of widely connected people quit together. METHODS We studied a densely interconnected social network of 12,067 people assessed repeatedly from(More)
How did human cooperation evolve? Recent evidence shows that many people are willing to engage in altruistic punishment, voluntarily paying a cost to punish noncooperators. Although this behavior helps to explain how cooperation can persist, it creates an important puzzle. If altruistic punishment provides benefits to nonpunishers and is costly to(More)
Participants in laboratory games are often willing to alter others' incomes at a cost to themselves, and this behaviour has the effect of promoting cooperation. What motivates this action is unclear: punishment and reward aimed at promoting cooperation cannot be distinguished from attempts to produce equality. To understand costly taking and costly giving,(More)
  • James H Fowler, James Fowler, Kevin Arceneaux, Robert Bond, Jan-Emmanuel De Neve, Pete Hatemi +5 others
  • 2013
T he American Political Science Review recently published a critique of an article we published in the Journal of Politics in 2008. In that article we showed that variants of the genes 5HTT and MAOA were significantly associated with voter turnout in a sample of 2,300 subjects from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. Here, we address the(More)