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First observations on the life cycle and mass eclosion events in a mantis fly (Family Mantispidae) in the subfamily Drepanicinae
TLDR
Observations of annual, near-synchronised, mass emergences of adults of the drepanicine, Ditaxis biseriata, within a well-established Macadamia orchard in northern New South Wales, Australia infer that the immature component of the life cycle takes place underground in forested habitats. Expand
Review of the bee genus Homalictus Cockerell (Hymenoptera: Halictidae) from Fiji with description of nine new species.
TLDR
The genus Homalictus Cockerell has not been taxonomically reviewed in the Fijian archipelago for 40 years, so the four known species are redescribed and nine new ones are described, bringing the number of endemic HomAlictus in Fiji to 13 species. Expand
Twenty six new species of Leioproctus (Colletellus): Australian Neopasiphaeinae, all but one with two submarginal cells (Hymenoptera, Colletidae, Leioproctus)
TLDR
Twenty six new species of Australian Leioproctus (subgenusColletellus) (Hymenoptera, Colletidae) are described and high resolution images of diagnostic characters for all type specimens are included. Expand
Climate change and invasive species: a physiological performance comparison of invasive and endemic bees in Fiji
TLDR
Comparisons of thermal tolerance, desiccation resistance, metabolic rate and seasonal performance adjustments of endemic and invasive bees in Fiji provide mixed support for current hypotheses for the functional basis of the success of invasive species. Expand
Radiation of tropical island bees and the role of phylogenetic niche conservatism as an important driver of biodiversity
TLDR
It is argued that phylogenetic niche conservatism is an important driver of tropical island bee biodiversity but that this phylogenetic inertia also leads to major extinction risks for tropical ectotherms under future warming climates. Expand
Climate change and invasive species: a physiological performance comparison of invasive and endemic bees in Fiji.
TLDR
Mixed support for current hypotheses for the functional basis of the success of invasive species is provided, however, it is expected the invasive bees in Fiji to be more resilient to climate change due to their increased thermal tolerance and desiccation resistance. Expand
Discovering Fiji’s Native Bees: Hidden Secrets in a Biodiversity Hotspot
Fiji’s entomological diversity has historically been considered depauperate. Recent widespread DNA barcoding efforts, however, from the South Australian Museum, Flinders University, and University ofExpand
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