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  • Patrick J Smith, James A. Blumenthal, +5 authors Andrew Sherwood
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Psychosomatic medicine
  • 2010 (First Publication: 1 April 2010)
  • OBJECTIVES To assess the effects of aerobic exercise training on neurocognitive performance. Although the effects of exercise on neurocognition have been the subject of several previous reviews andContinue Reading
  • Alan Rozanski, James A. Blumenthal, Karina W. Davidson, Patrice G. Saab, Laura D Kubzansky
  • Medicine
  • Journal of the American College of Cardiology
  • 2005 (First Publication: 1 March 2005)
  • Observational studies indicate that psychologic factors strongly influence the course of coronary artery disease (CAD). In this review, we examine new epidemiologic evidence for the associationContinue Reading
  • Lisa F. Berkman, James A. Blumenthal, +13 authors Neil Schneiderman
  • Medicine
  • JAMA
  • 2003 (First Publication: 18 June 2003)
  • CONTEXT Depression and low perceived social support (LPSS) after myocardial infarction (MI) are associated with higher morbidity and mortality, but little is known about whether this excess risk canContinue Reading
  • Judith H. Lichtman, J. Thomas Bigger, +7 authors Erika Sivarajan Froelicher
  • Medicine
  • Circulation
  • 2008 (First Publication: 29 September 2008)
  • Depression is commonly present in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) and is independently associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Screening tests for depressiveContinue Reading
  • Michael A. Babyak, James A. Blumenthal, +6 authors K. Ranga R. Krishnan
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Psychosomatic medicine
  • 2000 (First Publication: 1 September 2000)
  • OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to assess the status of 156 adult volunteers with major depressive disorder (MDD) 6 months after completion of a study in which they were randomly assigned toContinue Reading