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Since the late 1970s, China’s government has gradually eased restrictions on internal migration. The easing of restrictions, along with rapid growth of the Chinese economy, the forces of globalization, and substantial increases in foreign direct investment and local construction spending, have greatly stimulated internal migration. The recent availability(More)
Interprovincial Migration in China: The Effects of Investment and Migrant Networks Since the 1980s, China’s government has eased restrictions on internal migration. This easing, along with rapid growth of the Chinese economy and substantial increases in foreign and domestic investments, has greatly stimulated internal migration. Earlier studies have(More)
The Regulation of Migration in a Transition Economy: China's Hukou System Unlike most countries, China regulates internal migration. Public benefits, access to good quality housing, schools, health care, and attractive employment opportunities are available only to those who have local registration (Hukou). Coincident with the deepening of economic reforms,(More)
Aging and Migration in a Transition Economy: The Case of China Post-reform China has been experiencing two major demographic changes, an extraordinary amount of internal migration and an aging population. We present a general migration model which captures the idea that older migrants have shorter durations in the destination but possibly larger general(More)
For many of the spinal cord-injured (SCI) men who are able to produce an ejaculate, infertility because of poor semen quality is a concern. Impaired spermatogenesis has been attributed as a possible reason for the poor semen quality. If so, events that occur during spermatogenesis may be used as a marker to evaluate the extent of spermatogenic alteration.(More)
Confronted by the current global economic crisis, Taipei,China’s economy has suffered much like its neighbors. However, Taipei,China is different from other East Asia economies in several aspects. First, Taipei,China’s industrial organization is dominated by small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), unlike the chaebols of the Republic of Korea or the(More)
Since the late 1980s, the Chinese government has gradually eased restrictions to internal migration. This easing, along with rapid growth of the Chinese economy, substantial increases in foreign and domestic investments, and policies encouraging development in the Western provinces, have greatly stimulated internal migration. Earlier studies have(More)
The Effects of Aging on Migration in a Transition Economy: The Case of China China has been experiencing two major demographic sea changes since the late 1970s: (i) Internal migration, primarily rural-to-urban, on a scale that dwarfs all other countries at any time in history; and (ii) a shift in its age distribution. The basic question posed in this paper(More)
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