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This paper deals with the mathematical-statistical evaluation of experiments devoted to the following problems: 1. To what extent is the carcinogenic potency of automobile exhaust gas condensate dependent on the dose? 2. What fractions (groups of substances) of the automobile exhaust gas condensate are mainly responsible for the carcinogenic potency? 3. To(More)
BACKGROUND The increasing complexity of articulating spinal implants prohibits the use of serum-supplemented simulator fluid testing because multicomponent interfaces retain residual protein and preclude gravimetric measurement. Our original hypothesis was that simulator testing of a posterior dynamic stabilization implant that has metal-on-metal(More)
Flue gas condensate emitted from brown coal-fired stoves was tested in 3 dosages applied chronically to the skin of female CFLP mice twice a week over a period of 104 weeks. To answer the question which portion of the total carcinogenicity results from benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), this compound was taken as reference substance. The probit and Weibull analysis of(More)
Flue gas condensate from briquet-fired residential furnaces was separated into a polycyclic aromatic compound (PAC)-free and a PAC-containing part, followed by a subfractionation of the PAC-containing fraction into 3 parts: PAC consisting predominantly of (a) 2 and 3 rings, (b) 4 and 5 rings and (c) 6 and more rings. To evaluate the carcinogenic potency of(More)
The objective of this investigation was to identify the substances chiefly responsible for the carcinogenicity of the emission condensate from coal-fired residential furnaces. To realize this, the carcinogenic effect of various fractions was compared with that of an unseparated sample of emission condensate, tested in different doses. The probit and Weibull(More)
The objective of this investigation was to identify the substances chiefly responsible for the carcinogenicity of automobile exhaust condensate using topical application onto the skin of mice. This was performed by comparing the carcinogenic effect of various fractions with that of an unseparated sample of automobile exhaust condensate, tested in 3(More)