• Publications
  • Influence
Core stability training: applications to sports conditioning programs.
  • J. Willardson
  • Education
    Journal of strength and conditioning research
  • 1 August 2007
TLDR
The purpose of this review was to critically examine core stability training and other issues related to this topic to determine useful applications for sports conditioning programs.
The use of instability to train the core musculature.
TLDR
While unstable devices have been shown to be effective in decreasing the incidence of low back pain and increasing the sensory efficiency of soft tissues, they are not recommended as the primary exercises for hypertrophy, absolute strength, or power, especially in trained athletes.
Exercise and blood flow restriction.
TLDR
The purpose of this review was to discuss the relevant literature with regard to the type and magnitude of acute responses and chronic adaptations associated with BFR exercise protocols vs. traditional non-B FR exercise protocols.
A brief review: factors affecting the length of the rest interval between resistance exercise sets.
  • J. Willardson
  • Biology
    Journal of strength and conditioning research
  • 1 November 2006
TLDR
The length of the rest interval between sets is only 1 component of a resistance exercise program directed toward different training goals, and does not ensure a desired outcome if other components such as intensity and volume are not prescribed appropriately.
Acute Effects of Antagonist Stretching on Jump Height, Torque, and Electromyography of Agonist Musculature
TLDR
Results suggest that static stretching of the antagonist hamstrings before high-speed isokinetic knee extension increases the torque production, and stretching the hip flexors and dorsiflexors, the antagonists of the hip extensors and plantarflexors, may enhance jump height and power, although the effect sizes were small.
Rest Interval between Sets in Strength Training
TLDR
The rest interval between sets is an important variable that should receive more attention in resistance exercise prescription and when prescribed appropriately with other important prescriptive variables can influence the efficiency, safety and ultimate effectiveness of a strength training programme.
Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology position stand: The use of instability to train the core in athletic and nonathletic conditioning.
TLDR
The high muscle activation with the use of lower loads associated with instability resistance training suggests they can play an important role within a periodized training schedule, in rehabilitation programs, and for nonathletic individuals who prefer not to use ground-based free weights to achieve musculoskeletal health benefits.
Muscle activation during low- versus high-load resistance training in well-trained men
TLDR
Results indicate that training with a load of 30 % 1-RM to momentary muscular failure does not maximally activate the full motor unit pool of the quadriceps femoris and hamstrings during performance of multi-joint lower body exercise.
Exercise Order in Resistance Training
TLDR
Exercise order is an important variable that should receive greater attention in RT prescription when prescribed appropriately with other key prescriptive variables, as it can influence the efficiency, safety and ultimate effectiveness of an RT programme.
Effect of surface stability on core muscle activity for dynamic resistance exercises.
TLDR
Fitness trainers should be advised that each of the aforementioned lifts can be performed while standing on stable ground without losing the potential core muscle training benefits.
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