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Conservation of Arabidopsis Flowering Genes in Model Legumes1[w]
TLDR
The garden pea has been used for several decades as a model system for physiological genetics of flowering, and the lack of molecular information about pea flowering genes has prevented direct comparison with other systems, demonstrating the potential benefit of parallel model systems for an understanding of flowering phenology in crop and model legume species.
A Study of Gibberellin Homeostasis and Cryptochrome-Mediated Blue Light Inhibition of Hypocotyl Elongation1[W][OA]
TLDR
Surprisingly, no significant change in the GA4 content was detected in the whole shoot samples of the wild-type or cry1cry2 seedlings grown in the dark or continuous blue light, suggesting that cryptochromes may also regulate GA responsiveness and/or trigger cell- or tissue-specific changes of the level of bioactive GAs.
The Medicago FLOWERING LOCUS T Homolog, MtFTa1, Is a Key Regulator of Flowering Time1[C][W][OA]
TLDR
The diversity of the regulation and function of the Medicago FT family is revealed, with MtFTa1 the only one of the FT genes that is up-regulated by both long days and vernalization, conditions that promote Medicago flowering, and transgenic Medicago plants overexpressing the MtFTb1 gene flowered very rapidly.
Genetic dissection of blue-light sensing in tomato using mutants deficient in cryptochrome 1 and phytochromes A, B1 and B2.
TLDR
Results provide the first mutant-based characterization of cry1 in a plant species other than Arabidopsis, and suggest that an additional non-phytochrome photoreceptor may be active under short daily BL exposures.
Manipulation of the Blue Light Photoreceptor Cryptochrome 2 in Tomato Affects Vegetative Development, Flowering Time, and Fruit Antioxidant Content1
TLDR
Tomato CRY2 overexpressors show phenotypes similar to but distinct from their Arabidopsis counterparts, but also several novel ones, including a high-pigment phenotype, resulting in overproduction of anthocyanins and chlorophyll in leaves and of flavonoids and lycopene in fruits.
The Pea GIGAS Gene Is a FLOWERING LOCUS T Homolog Necessary for Graft-Transmissible Specification of Flowering but Not for Responsiveness to Photoperiod[C][W]
TLDR
It is suggested that induction of flowering by photoperiod in pea results from interactions among several members of a diversified FT family, and one gene (FTa1) is identified as GIGAS, and another (FTb2) is associated with a second mobile signal and a broader role inPhotoperiod responsiveness.
Tendril-less Regulates Tendril Formation in Pea Leaves[W][OA]
TLDR
Phylogenetic analyses show that Tl is an unusual Class I HDZIP protein and that tendrils evolved either once or twice in Papilionoid legumes, and suggest that tendril arose in the Fabeae clade of Papilionoids legumes through acquisition of the Tl gene.
Physiological interactions of phytochromes A, B1 and B2 in the control of development in tomato.
TLDR
The role of phy tochrome B2 in the control of photomorphogenesis in tomato has been investigated using recently isolated mutants carrying lesions in the PHYB2 gene, indicating that at least one of the two remaining phytochromes plays a significant role in tomato photomorphesis.
Natural variation at the soybean J locus improves adaptation to the tropics and enhances yield
TLDR
The cloning and characterization of J are reported, and J is identified as the ortholog of Arabidopsis thaliana EARLY FLOWERING 3 (ELF3), and an important new component in flowering-time control in soybean is identified, providing new insight into soybean adaptation to tropical regions.
Pea LATE BLOOMER1 Is a GIGANTEA Ortholog with Roles in Photoperiodic Flowering, Deetiolation, and Transcriptional Regulation of Circadian Clock Gene Homologs1[W][OA]
TLDR
Results show that several functions of Arabidopsis GIGANTEA are conserved in its pea ortholog and demonstrate that genetic pathways for photoperiodic flowering are likely to be conserved between these two species.
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