• Publications
  • Influence
Paraquat poisoning: clinical features and immediate general management
TLDR
Experience suggests that management of the terminally ill patient with acute fulminant poisoning is a far greater clinical challenge to medical and nursing expertise than simply the employment of methods to prevent absorption or increase elimination of paraquat. Expand
Position paper: Single-dose activated charcoal.
TLDR
There are no satisfactorily designed clinical studies assessing benefit from single-dose activated charcoal to guide the use of this therapy and the administration of activated charcoal may be considered if a patient has ingested a potentially toxic amount of a poison up to one hour previously. Expand
Position Paper on Urine Alkalinization
TLDR
Urine alkalinization cannot be recommended as first line treatment in cases of phenobarbital poisoning as multiple‐dose activated charcoal is superior and there is no evidence to suggest that relatively short‐duration alkalemia poses a risk to life in normal individuals or in those with coronary and cerebral arterial disease. Expand
The Role of Oximes in the Treatment of Nerve Agent Poisoning in Civilian Casualties
TLDR
A review of available experimental evidence suggests that there are no clinically important differences between pralidoxime, obidoxime and HI-6 in the treatment of nerve agent poisoning, if studies employing pre-treatment with pyridostigmine are excluded. Expand
Intravenous N-acetylcysteine: the treatment of choice in paracetamol poisoning?
Neutropenia associated with metronidazole A M Geddes, FRCPED, and M W McKendrick, MRCP ...................... 1438 Fatal carbon monoxide poisoning-a new circumstance A J Crisp, MRCP, and Kathleen MExpand
Paracetamol poisoning and the kidney
  • A. Jones, J. Vale
  • Medicine
  • Journal of clinical pharmacy and therapeutics
  • 1 February 1993
TLDR
It is possible that antidotal therapy with agents such as N–acetylcysteine may not prevent renal toxicity and, indeed, on the basis of animal work, may actually potentiate tubular damage. Expand
Non-narcotic analgesics. Problems of overdosage.
TLDR
Hepatic and renal failure should be managed conventionally and specific protective agents in those patients at risk of paracetamol-induced liver damage include N-acetylcysteine and methionine which are most effective if given within 8 to 10 hours of ingestion of the overdose. Expand
Use of charcoal haemoperfusion in the management of severely poisoned patients.
TLDR
Charcoal coated with a synthetic hydrogel overcomes many of the disadvantages associated with the use of uncoated material in that there is a much reduced thrombocytopenia and no evidence of charcoal embolism. Expand
ORAL METHIONINE IN THE TREATMENT OF SEVERE PARACETAMOL (ACETAMINOPHEN) OVERDOSE
TLDR
It is suggested that methionine may be effective in reducing the frequency and severity of paracetamol-induced liver damage and may provide an effective non-toxic alternative to cysteamine. Expand
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