• Publications
  • Influence
Reactive and Endogenous Depressions—Response to E.C.T.
  • J. T. Rose
  • Psychology
    British Journal of Psychiatry
  • 1 March 1963
TLDR
The results indicated that all types of depression were of equal severity, and provided evidence that reactive and endogenous depressions respond differently to E.C.T., the latter group having a more favourable outcome.
A Comparison of Nortriptyline and Amitriptyline in Depression
TLDR
Comparison without diagnostic classification showed no significant difference in outcome between the two drugs, although amitriptyline was consistently more effective, and reactive depressions on this drug showed the least improvement but not significantly inferior to reactive and endogenous cases on nortriptylines.
COMPARISON OF DESIPRAMINE AND IMIPRAMINE IN DEPRESSION.
In a comparative double-blind trial on 40 patients with primary depression, desipramine and imipramine did not differ significantly in antidepressant effect or onset of action. Reactive and
Treatment of Depression
TLDR
Examination of both the overall scores and the individual symptom scores showed imipramine and desipramines to be similar in anti-depressant potency and provided no evidence that either drug had any advantage with regard to speed of action; the latter result raises doubt on the view that desipamine is the active metabolite of imipramsine.
Depression: prognosis and drug treatment.
A PRELIMINARY STUDY OF NORTRIPTYLINE IN DEPRESSION.
The sudden and unexpected withdrawal of tranylcypromine (Parnate) from the market provided an unusual opportunity to study the effects on patients of withdrawal of psychotherapeutic drugs. A survey
PHENOXYPROPAZINE AND CHLORDIAZEPOXIDE IN DEPRESSION.
  • J. T. Rose
  • Psychology
    The American journal of psychiatry
  • 1 March 1964
TLDR
It is concluded that phenoxypropazine is an effective antidepressant drug which when given with chlordiazepoxide forms a useful therapy for depressions of a reactive nature.
Autonomic function in depression: a modified methacholine test.
  • J. T. Rose
  • Psychology
    The Journal of mental science
  • 1 September 1962
TLDR
It is argued that the only reliable component of this test—the drop in blood pressure—is chiefly related to peripheral end-organ involvement and is therefore unlikely to predict the response to E.C.T., and doubting the validity of Gellhorn's theory that the methacholine test is an index of central sympathetic reactivity only.
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