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“You are what you eat”: Diet modifies cuticular hydrocarbons and nestmate recognition in the Argentine ant, Linepithema humile
Abstract Nestmate recognition plays a key role in the behavior and evolution of social insects. We demonstrated that hydrocarbons are the chemical cues used in Argentine ant, Linepithema humile,Expand
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Nestmate discrimination in ants: effect of bioassay on aggressive behavior
Summary: Aggression assays are commonly used to study nestmate recognition in social insects. Methods range from detailed behavioral observations on small numbers of insects to counts of individualsExpand
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The diminutive supercolony: the Argentine ants of the southeastern United States
Native to Argentina and Brazil, the Argentine ant (Linepithema humile) is an invasive species that has become established on six continents and many oceanic islands. In several parts of itsExpand
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The Argentine ant: challenges in managing an invasive unicolonial pest.
The Argentine ant, Linepithema humile, has invaded urban, agricultural, and natural habitats worldwide, causing economic damage and disrupting ecosystem processes. Introduced populations of L. humileExpand
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Diet-Related Modification of Cuticular Hydrocarbon Profiles of the Argentine Ant, Linepithema humile, Diminishes Intercolony Aggression
Territorial boundaries between conspecific social insect colonies are maintained through a highly developed nestmate recognition system modulated by heritable and, in some instances, nonheritableExpand
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Geographical variation in Argentine ant aggression behaviour mediated by environmentally derived nestmate recognition cues
Social insects use a complex of recognition cues when discriminating nestmates from non-nestmate conspecifics. In the Argentine ant, Linepithema humile, recognition cues can be derived from exogenousExpand
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Hydrocarbon-released nestmate aggression in the Argentine ant, Linepithema humile, following encounters with insect prey.
Argentine ants, Linepithema humile, were attacked by their nestmates following contact with a particular prey item, the brown-banded cockroach, Supella longipalpa. Contact with prey, as brief as 2Expand
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Urban areas may serve as habitat and corridors for dry-adapted, heat tolerant species; an example from ants
We collected ants from six urban and one forest land-use types in Raleigh, NC to examine the effects of urbanization on species richness and assemblage composition. Since urban areas are warmerExpand
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Is It Easy to Be Urban? Convergent Success in Urban Habitats among Lineages of a Widespread Native Ant
The most rapidly expanding habitat globally is the urban habitat, yet the origin and life histories of the populations of native species that inhabit this habitat remain poorly understood. We use DNAExpand
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Queen acceptance and the complexity of nestmate discrimination in the Argentine ant
In most social insect species, individuals recognize and behave aggressively towards non-nestmate conspecifics to maintain colony integrity. However, introduced populations of the invasive ArgentineExpand
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