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The human chin revisited: what is it and who has it?
TLDR
The essential features of symphyseal morphology in H. sapiens are pointed out, which are present and well-defined in the fetus at least as early as the fifth gestational month and serve to emphasize the importance of studying this region in juveniles whenever possible.
Evolutionary relationships of living lemurs and lorises (Mammalia, Primates) and their potential affinities with European Eocene Adapidae. Anthropological papers of the AMNH ; v. 60, pt. 1
TLDR
The dental Morphology of the Living Strepsirhine Primates Primates is studied through the lens of cheirogaleidae, which describes the chemoreception of teeth in lemurs.
A review of the Pleistocene hominoid fauna of the Socialist Republic of Vietnam (excluding Hylobatidae). Anthropological papers of the AMNH ; no. 76
Liste commentees de sites vietnamiens ayant fournit une faune hominoide du Pleistocene et systematique des especes
Phylogeny and nomenclature in the "Lemur-group" of Malagasy strepsirhine primates
TLDR
A quantitative parsimony analysis of craniodental characters of Varecia, Lemur catta, and the species of the "fulvus-complex" do indeed form a monophyletic group; but in view of the uncertainties that continue to surround relationships within this group it is strongly doubt that nomenclatural innovation is justified at this point.
Sudden Origins: Fossils, Genes, and the Emergence of Species
TLDR
This book discusses development, Inheritance, and Evolutionary Change in humans as Embryos, and how humans distinguished themselves from the rest of the animal world.
Defining the genus Homo
TLDR
The boundaries of both the species and the genus remain as fuzzy as ever, new fossils having been rather haphazardly assigned to species of Homo, with minimal attention to details of morphology.
Significance of some previously unrecognized apomorphies in the nasal region of Homo neanderthalensis.
TLDR
The purpose of this contribution is to describe specializations of the Neanderthal internal nasal region that make them unique not only among hominids but possibly among terrestrial mammals in general as well.
Hominids and hybrids: the place of Neanderthals in human evolution.
TLDR
Although many students of human evolution have lately begun to look favorably on the view that these distinctive hominids merit species recognition in their own right as Homo neanderthalensis, at least as many still regard them as no more than a strange variant of the authors' own species, Homo sapiens.
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