• Publications
  • Influence
Walknet, a bio-inspired controller for hexapod walking
TLDR
This review summarizes the most important biological findings described by Walknet and how they can be simulated and the ability of this decentralized reactive controller to form the basis for the simulation of higher-level cognitive faculties exceeding the capabilities of insects.
Load sensing and control of posture and locomotion.
LOAD-COMPENSATING REACTIONS IN THE PROXIMAL LEG JOINTS OF STICK INSECTS DURING STANDING AND WALKING
TLDR
The results prove directly for the first time the important function of single groups of trochanteral campaniform sensilla in the control of posture and locomotion in stick insects.
Walking: A Complex Behavior Controlled by Simple Networks
TLDR
This article reviews the control of walking in stick insects, beginning with behavioral studies of single-leg control and the interleg coordinating mechanisms, and indicates that the high flexibility and adaptability is based on a simple distributed control structure.
Signals from load sensors underlie interjoint coordination during stepping movements of the stick insect leg.
TLDR
It is shown that cuticular strain signals from the trochanteral CS play a major role in shaping TC-joint motoneuronal activity during walking and contribute to their coordination with the stepping pattern of the distal leg joints.
Insect walking is based on a decentralized architecture revealing a simple and robust controller
TLDR
This architecture is summarized in the form of the artificial neural network, Walknet, that is heavily dependent on sensory feedback at the proprioceptive level and transforms a passive displacement of a joint into an active movement, generating synergistic assistance reflexes in all mechanically coupled joints.
The depressor trochanteris motoneurones and their role in the coxo-trochanteral feedback loop in the stick insect Carausius morosus
  • J. Schmitz
  • Biology
    Biological Cybernetics
  • 1 October 1986
TLDR
The hypothesis that the trHP is the only effective feedback transducer for the coxo-trochanteral control loop (Schmitz 1984, 1986) is confirmed by the nerve recordings from nerve C2, and the frequency responses of the excitatory depressor motoneurones show that the spontaneous activity of the SDTr mot oneurone is modulated by the stimulus over a wide range of stimulus frequencies up to 100 Hz.
The two groups of sensilla in the ventral coxal hairplate of Carausius morosus have different roles during walking
TLDR
Testing of the function of the ventral coxal hairplate of the stick insect Carausius morosus Br.
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