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Estimates of Regional and Global Life Expectancy, 1800–2001
Historians and demographers have gone to considerable trouble to reconstruct life expectancy in the past in individual countries. This overview collects information from a large body of that work and
Rising Life Expectancy: A Global History
TLDR
A brief overview of the health transition is presented, focusing on public health, medicine, wealth, income, and economic development, and literacy and education.
The timing and pace of health transitions around the world.
  • J. Riley
  • Medicine, Political Science
  • 1 December 2005
Estimates from some 700 mostly national studies of survival in the past are assembled to create a broad picture of regional and global life expectancy gains across space and time and to examine
Changing family size in England and Wales: place, class and demography, 1891–1911
TLDR
The reader continually stumbles over statements that are challengeable, or entirely too absolute, and tend to vitiate the strengths of the work, which detracts from the value of the arguments.
The effect of water fluoridation and social inequalities on dental caries in 5-year-old children.
TLDR
Water fluoridation reduces dental caries experience more in materially deprived wards than in affluent wards and the introduction of water fluoridation would substantially reduce inequalities in dental health.
Frailty, sickness, and death: models of morbidity and mortality in historical populations.
of health', which consists of declining morbidity rates. We wish to challenge these assumptions by examining an historical episode of declining mortality where evidence is also available about
Milk fluoridation: a comparison of dental health in two school communities in England.
TLDR
A difference inChildren with caries experience of 13% and a difference in children with active decay of 16% was found when a district with a community fluoridated milk programme was compared with a district without a fluoridated Milk programme.
The risk of being sick: morbidity trends in four countries.
  • J. Riley
  • Medicine, Political Science
  • 1 September 1990
TLDR
Evidence about recent trends in mortality and sickness in four countries, Japan, the United States, and Britain, are developed countries where the trend of declining death rates is of long duration, and where health surveys have been conducted regularly for a number of years.
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