• Publications
  • Influence
The royal inscriptions of Tiglath-pileser III (744-727 BC) and Shalmaneser V (726-722 BC), kings of Assyria
The Royal Inscriptions of Tiglath-pileser III (744–727 BC) and Shalmaneser V (726–722 BC), Kings of Assyria (Royal Inscriptions of the Neo-Assyrian Period 1) carries on where the Assyrian PeriodsExpand
  • 30
  • 3
Etiology of genital ulcers and prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus coinfection in 10 US cities. The Genital Ulcer Disease Surveillance Group.
To determine the etiology of genital ulcers and to assess the prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in ulcer patients in 10 US cities, ulcer and serum specimens were collectedExpand
  • 146
  • 2
High prevalence of Helicobacter heilmannii-associated gastritis in a small, predominantly rural area: further evidence in support of a zoonosis?
BACKGROUND Primary hosts of Helicobacter heilmannii are domestic animals--cats, dogs and pigs, but rarely is it detected in gastric biopsies from humans. We found H. heilmannii in gastric biopsiesExpand
  • 49
  • 2
The Royal Inscriptions of Sennacherib, King of Assyria (704-681 Bc), Part 1
The Royal Inscriptions of Sennacherib, King of Assyria (704-681 BC), Part 2 (Royal Inscriptions of the Neo-Assyrian Period 3/2) provides reliable, up-to-date editions of 195 texts of Sennacherib, asExpand
  • 45
  • 1
The Royal Inscriptions of Amēl-Marduk (561–560 BC), Neriglissar (559–556 BC), and Nabonidus (555–539 BC), Kings of Babylon
Amēl-Marduk (561–560 BC), Neriglissar (559–556 BC), and Nabonidus (555–539 BC) were the last native kings of Babylon. In this modern scholarly edition of the complete extant corpus of royalExpand
  • 1
Sîn-šarru-iškun and Ezida in Calah
Sin-sarru-iskun, like his father Assurbanipal and his grandfather Esarhaddon, appears to have been actively engaged in building projects in Assur, Calah, and Nineveh. Bricks, clay cylinders, cones,Expand
  • 2
The Royal Inscriptions of the Neo-Assyrian Period Online
Presents fully searchable, annotated editions of the royal inscriptions of Neo-Assyrian kings Tiglath-pileser III (744-727 BC), Shalmaneser V (726-722 BC), Sargon II (721-705 BC), SennacheribExpand
  • 3
New Proposed Chronological Sequence and Dates of Composition of Esarhaddon's Babylon Inscriptions
  • J. Novotny
  • History
  • Journal of Cuneiform Studies
  • 1 January 2015
The Babylon Inscriptions of Esarhaddon, perhaps the best-known group of texts in the extant corpus this seventh-century Assyrian king, have for decades presented a real challenge in cracking theExpand
  • 2
  • PDF