• Publications
  • Influence
International occupational health.
  • J. LaDou
  • Medicine
  • International journal of hygiene and…
  • 2003
Working conditions for the majority of the world's workers do not meet the minimum standards and guidelines set by international agencies. Occupational health and safety laws cover only about 10Expand
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  • PDF
The Case for a Global Ban on Asbestos
BACKGROUND All forms of asbestos are now banned in 52 countries. Safer products have replaced many materials that once were made with it. Nonetheless, many countries still use, import, and exportExpand
  • 123
  • 6
  • PDF
Export of Electronics Equipment Waste
Abstract Electronics equipment waste (“e-waste”) includes discarded computers, computer monitors, television sets, and cell phones. Less than 10% of e-waste is currently recycled. The United StatesExpand
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  • PDF
Circadian Rhythms and Athletic Performance.
  • J. LaDou
  • Medicine
  • The Physician and sportsmedicine
  • 1 July 1979
Travel across time zones can have an adverse effect on athletes' performances. It helps to know how to resynchronize the 'body clock.'
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The asbestos cancer epidemic.
  • J. LaDou
  • Medicine, Biology
  • Environmental health perspectives
  • 24 November 2003
The asbestos cancer epidemic may take as many as 10 million lives before asbestos is banned worldwide and exposures are brought to an end. In many developed countries, in the most affected ageExpand
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  • 4
  • PDF
Health effects of shift work.
  • J. LaDou
  • Medicine
  • The Western journal of medicine
  • 1 December 1982
More than 13.5 million American workers, close to 20 percent of the work force, are assigned to evening or night shifts. In some industries such as automobile, petrochemical and textile manufacturingExpand
  • 42
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The hazards of chrysotile asbestos: a critical review.
Chrysotile, or "white", asbestos is the dominant form of asbestos in international commerce today. It accounts for 99% of current world asbestos production of 2 million tonnes. Chrysotile is anExpand
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American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine (ACOEM): A Professional Association in Service to Industry
Abstract The American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine (ACOEM) is a professional association that represents the interests of its companyemployed physician members. Fifty years agoExpand
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Occupational and Environmental Medicine in the United States: A Proposal to Abolish Workers' Compensation and Reestablish the Public Health Model
  • J. LaDou
  • Medicine
  • International journal of occupational and…
  • 1 April 2006
Abstract The workers' compensation model of occupational and environmental medicine should be converted to a public health model. Occupational and environmental medicine, as a part of the publicExpand
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Cancer and Reproductive Risks in the Semiconductor Industry
  • J. LaDou, J. Bailar
  • Business, Medicine
  • International journal of occupational and…
  • 1 October 2007
Abstract Although many reproductive toxicants and carcinogens are used in the manufacture of semiconductor chips, and worrisome findings have been reported, no broad epidemiologic study has beenExpand
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