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Mate choice or polyandry: reconciling genetic compatibility and good genes sexual selection
TLDR
This model shows that if there is some cost of mating, then some form of sperm selection based on compatibility is essential for the evolution of polyandry for compatibility, and finds that when both good genes and compatibility selection are in operation, selection for compatibility can reduce directional sexual selection by causing females to mate with males of lower genetic quality.
Sperm competition games played by dimorphic male beetles
TLDR
Comparing testis size and ejaculate characteristics between male dung beetles in the genus Onthophagus can be separated into two morphs finds that in O. binodis 30% of males are sneaks, and sneaks have larger testes, ejaculate volumes, and longer sperm than guards.
Measuring relative investment: a case study of testes investment in species with alternative male reproductive tactics
TLDR
A case study from the field of sperm competition and alternative male reproductive tactics, where the problems and the logic behind the solutions are likely to be the same in many other fields.
Towards a resolution of the lek paradox
TLDR
Results from experiments showing that male courtship rate in the dung beetle Onthophagus taurus is a condition-dependent trait that is preferred by females are a significant step towards a resolution of the lek paradox.
Matters of Scale: Positive Allometry and the Evolution of Male Dimorphisms
TLDR
These findings question the currently held view that beetle horn dimorphisms showcase the importance of developmental independence in the evolution of diversity, and use predictions derived from allometric modeling to test for the existence of reprogramming thresholds.
The limits of elaboration: curved allometries reveal the constraints on mandible size in stag beetles
TLDR
It is shown that curvature in the allometric relationship between mandible length and body size in some stag beetles declines in the largest males, and that this curvature is most pronounced in species with relatively long mandibles, consistent with the hypothesis that the decrease in slope is caused by the increasing costs of large mandibles.
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