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Influence of ambient (outdoor) sources on residential indoor and personal PM2.5 concentrations: Analyses of RIOPA data
TLDR
The mean of the distribution of ambient contributions across study homes agreed well for themass balance and RCS models, but the distribution was somewhat broader when calculated using the mass balance model with measured air exchange rates. Expand
Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the indoor and outdoor air of three cities in the U.S.
TLDR
The indoor and outdoor concentrations of 30 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were measured in 55 nonsmoking residences in three urban areas during June 1999-May 2000 and showed that indoor sources had a significant effect on indoor concentrations of 3-ring PAHs and a smaller effect on 4-rings and that outdoor sources dominated the indoor concentrations. Expand
Relationships of Indoor, Outdoor, and Personal Air (RIOPA). Part I. Collection methods and descriptive analyses.
TLDR
The results show that indoor sources dominated personal and indoor air concentrations of many measured VOCs and carbonyl compounds, and associations derived from or models based on this data set that may link the influence of outdoor sources with indoorAir toxics and PM2.5 can be relevant to other urban settings. Expand
Relationship of Indoor, Outdoor and Personal Air (RIOPA) study: study design, methods and quality assurance/control results
TLDR
The results from the RIOPA study can potentially provide information on the influence of ambient sources on indoor air concentrations and exposure for many air toxics and will furnish an opportunity to evaluate exposure models for these compounds. Expand
Gas/particle distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in coupled outdoor/indoor atmospheres
Abstract Concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), PM2.5, and organic and elemental carbon (OC and EC) were measured in 48 h integrated samples collected in the indoor and outdoorExpand
Source proximity and outdoor-residential VOC concentrations: results from the RIOPA study.
TLDR
The residential ambient air concentrations were 1.5-4 times higher than the urban background levels outside homes very close to ambient emission sources where approximately 7% of the population live, however, the relative increase of risk for disease is small and variations in air concentration in the background urban atmosphere are greater than those from the proximity to roadways. Expand
Concentrations and Source Characteristics of Airborne Carbonyl Compounds Measured Outside Urban Residences
TLDR
The authors found that the concentrations of formal- dehyde, acetaldehyde, acrolein, propionaldehyde, crotonaldehyde, benzaldehyde, glyoxal, and methylglyoxal significantly decreased with increasing distance between a measured residence and one or more major roadways, and found significant negative associations between concentrations for most of the measured carbonyl compounds and each of the following meteorological parameters: mixing height, wind speed, and precipitation. Expand
Fine organic particulate matter dominates indoor-generated PM2.5 in RIOPA homes
TLDR
One interesting effect of increased indoor OM concentrations is a shift in the gas-particle partitioning of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from the gas to the particle phase with outdoor-to-indoor transport. Expand
Effects of air pollution on asthma hospitalization rates in different age groups in metropolitan cities of Korea
TLDR
Whether air pollution effects on asthmatic hospital admissions are different by three age groups (years): children, adults (15–64; reference group), and the elderly (over 65) is determined. Expand
Functional group characterization of indoor, outdoor, and personal PM: results from RIOPA.
TLDR
The presence of sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, soil dust and a number of organic functional groups and the first time that FTIR spectroscopy has been used to characterize the composition of indoor and personal PM(2.5) samples are detected. Expand
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