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Collective memory and spatial sorting in animal groups.
TLDR
The first evidence for collective memory is presented in such animal groups (where the previous history of group structure influences the collective behaviour exhibited as individual interactions change) during the transition of a group from one type of collective behaviour to another.
Effective leadership and decision-making in animal groups on the move
TLDR
It is revealed that the larger the group the smaller the proportion of informed individuals needed to guide the group, and that only a very small proportion ofinformed individuals is required to achieve great accuracy.
Exploring Animal Social Networks
TLDR
This paper presents a meta-modelling framework for estimating the values of node-based measures and describes its use in a number of real-world situations.
Effects of parasites on fish behaviour: a review and evolutionary perspective
TLDR
Little conclusive evidence is found for the Parasite Increased Trophic Transmission (PITT) hypothesis in fishes, though recent studies suggest it is likely to be an important mechanism, and a case study is provided to summarise the current state of knowledge.
Correlates of boldness in three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus)
TLDR
The results suggest that, contrary to some previous studies on other animals, bold or shy behaviour in sticklebacks is consistent between contexts.
Mortality risk of spatial positions in animal groups: The danger of being in the front
We modified Hamilton's (1971) selfish herd model by introducing directional movement to the prey groups and the predators. The consequences of this modification with regards to differential predation
Social network theory in the behavioural sciences: potential applications
TLDR
This review identifies several broad research areas where the networks approach could greatly enhance the understanding of social patterns and processes in animals.
Quorum decision-making facilitates information transfer in fish shoals
TLDR
It is shown that effective and accurate information transfer in groups may be gained only through nonlinear responses of group members to each other, thus highlighting the importance of quorum decision-making.
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