• Publications
  • Influence
The Swift X-Ray Telescope
TLDR
The X-ray telescope (XRT) enables Swift to determine GRB positions with a few arcseconds accuracy within 100 s of the burst onset, and will measure spectra and lightcurves of the GRB afterglow beginning about a minute after the burst and will follow each burst for days or weeks.
Methods and results of an automatic analysis of a complete sample of Swift-XRT observations of GRBs
We present a homogeneous X-ray analysis of all 318 gamma-ray bursts detected by the X-ray telescope (XRT) on the Swift satellite up to 2008 July 23; this represents the largest sample of X-ray GRB
The association of GRB 060218 with a supernova and the evolution of the shock wave
TLDR
A supernova is caught in the act of exploding, directly observing the shock break-out, which indicates that the GRB progenitor was a Wolf–Rayet star.
Relativistic jet activity from the tidal disruption of a star by a massive black hole
TLDR
Observations of a bright X-ray flare from the extragalactic transient Swift J164449.3+573451 conclude that they have captured the onset of relativistic jet activity from a supermassive black hole.
A γ-ray burst at a redshift of z ≈ 8.2
Long-duration γ-ray bursts (GRBs) are thought to result from the explosions of certain massive stars, and some are bright enough that they should be observable out to redshifts of z > 20 using
The XMM-Newton optical/UV monitor telescope
The XMM-OM instrument extends the spec- tral coverage of the XMM-Newton observatory into the ul- traviolet and optical range. It provides imaging and time- resolved data on targets simultaneously
Fermi Observations of High-Energy Gamma-Ray Emission from GRB 080916C
TLDR
The Gamma-ray Burst Monitor and Large Area Telescope onboard the Fermi Observatory together record GRBs over a broad energy range spanning about 7 decades of gammaray energy, with the largest apparent energy release yet measured.
Bright X-ray Flares in Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows
TLDR
Two bright x-ray flares in GRB afterglows, including a giant flare comparable in total energy to the burst itself, each peaking minutes after the burst, imply that the central engines of the bursts have long periods of activity.
A short γ-ray burst apparently associated with an elliptical galaxy at redshift z = 0.225
Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) come in two classes: long (> 2 s), soft-spectrum bursts and short, hard events. Most progress has been made on understanding the long GRBs, which are typically observed at
Announcement of the Swift/BAT Hard X-ray Transient Monitor
The Swift/Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) hard X-ray transient monitor provides near real-time coverage of the X-ray sky in the energy range 15-50 keV. The BAT observes 88% of the sky each day with a
...
...