• Publications
  • Influence
How a drug becomes "ethnic": law, commerce, and the production of racial categories in medicine.
  • J. Kahn
  • Medicine
  • Yale journal of health policy, law, and ethics
  • 12 March 2004
A drug called BiDil is poised to become the first drug ever approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat heart failure in African Americans - and only African Americans. This articleExpand
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The Science and Business of Genetic Ancestry Testing
Commercially available tests of genetic ancestry have significant scientific limitations, but are serious matters for many test-takers.
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Race, Pharmacogenomics, and Marketing: Putting BiDil in Context
  • J. Kahn
  • Medicine
  • The American journal of bioethics : AJOB
  • 1 January 2006
This article endeavors to place into context recent developments surrounding the United States Food and Drug Administration recent approval of BiDil® (isosorbide dinitrate/hydralazine hydrochloride)Expand
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Race and ancestry in biomedical research: exploring the challenges
The use of race in biomedical research has, for decades, been a source of social controversy. However, recent events, such as the adoption of racially targeted pharmaceuticals, have raised theExpand
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Getting the Numbers Right: Statistical Mischief and Racial Profiling in Heart Failure Research
  • J. Kahn
  • Medicine
  • Perspectives in biology and medicine
  • 1 January 2003
The claim that blacks die from heart failure at a rate twice that of whites is informing efforts to develop and market the drug BiDil®, which is currently undergoing clinical trials to be approved byExpand
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Misreading race and genomics after BiDil
  • J. Kahn
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Nature Genetics
  • 1 July 2005
  • 48
  • 2
From Disparity to Difference: How Race-Specific Medicines May Undermine Policies to Address Inequalities in Health Care
  • J. Kahn
  • Political Science, Medicine
  • Southern California interdisciplinary law journal
  • 16 May 2006
On June 23, 2005, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) formally approved the heart failure drug BiDil to treat heart failure in self-identified black patients. The drug itself is not actuallyExpand
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